Gavin Erickson

Gavin Erickson

You’ve probably heard of this alternative medicine, but how much do you know about it? Find out how acupuncture could help - and heal - you.

Physiotherapists. Osteopaths. Chiropractors. Anyone who has had a sports injury will probably have seen one of these experts. But how many of us would consider having needles stuck into our sides, even by an expert?

Thursday, 10 March 2016 09:39

Acupuncture Awareness Week

Olympic swimmer Rebecca Adlington reveals how she's overcoming the pain from her dramatic crash on The Jump.

Thursday, 03 March 2016 10:03

Acupuncture freed me up

Rebecca Newbold has electro acupuncture for an old car accident induced back injury.

The Olympic swimming legend suffered a dislocated shoulder during Channel 4's winter sports show but is returning for Sunday's final following surgery and acupuncture

We’re famously a nation who don’t like to make a fuss, but the ‘grin and bear it’ attitude of many Brits could be harmful for their health, according to a new report released to mark Acupuncture Awareness Week.

Anxiety UK and the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC) have launched a joint pilot project which will see members of Anxiety UK being able to access traditional acupuncture through this new partnership.

Throughout the pilot project, data will be collected to determine the effectiveness of traditional acupuncture for treating those living with anxiety and anxiety based depression. This will enable both parties to continue to build a body of evidence to measure the success rate of this type of treatment.

Of those Anxiety UK members who have received traditional acupuncture from BAcC members, 74% reported anxiety was the primary reason for seeking treatment while 62% said it was a secondary reason.

We’re famously a nation that doesn’t like to make a fuss but new statistics from the British Acupuncture Council reveal that when it comes to pain nearly half of Brits (44%) just grin and bear it, which could impact long term health and wellbeing.

According to the report released today to mark Acupuncture Awareness Week (7th-13th March 2016), almost three in ten Brits (29%) exercise more now than they did ten years ago but more than half (52%) say they’ve been injured during sport in the past and one in three (30%) claim to have never recovered from their injuries.

To overcome a sporting injury, almost three in five people (56%) say they take oral painkillers, and nearly a third (32%) turn to ice and heat packs, compared to just 11% who opt for traditional acupuncture.

Andrew Jackson, a qualified member of the British Acupuncture Council comments: ‘Many people put up with pain when they don’t need to. Often discomfort from musculoskeletal problems can be alleviated with the correct diagnosis and treatment. Traditional acupuncture is an evidence based therapy that has been shown to help reduce pain and swelling, increase blood flow to promote recovery and help restore movement at the site of injury.’

The report of 2,000 UK adults revealed nearly three quarters of people (73%) have never tried traditional acupuncture with three in ten Brits (30%) admitting they’re unaware of how the therapy could help them.

Andrew continues: ‘In my experience, a lot of patients either ignore their injury or opt for painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs without ever being physically examined. Painkillers often mask the problem and don’t always address any potential underlying issues. Traditional acupuncture can help to identify the root cause of a problem, improving a patient’s understanding and management of symptoms for a more positive long-term outcome.’

Thursday, 28 January 2016 09:52

Traditional acupuncture and back pain

Hear how traditional acupuncture helped Jeff and Paul with back pain problems.