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Terrible reaction to acupuncture

Q:   My doctor offered me acupuncture, I had a terrible reaction to just a few seconds of it, and had to stop, I tried reiki and the same happened, could you explain why this is ? I am a great believer in alternative remedies.

 

A: There is no doubt that there are a few people who are extremely sensitive to treatment aimed at the energetics of the body. Most practitioners have a least two or three patients for whom acupuncture may not be the best choice of treatment and who use acupressure or moxibustion as the treatment of choice.
 
However, without knowing exactly what style of acupuncture your doctor uses, the underlying theory of western medical acupuncture often involves trigger points and the use of some fairly direct treatments which some people find a little painful. It is possible that a practitioner using acupuncture on the basis of Chinese medical theory may be a little gentler. There would certainly be no harm in speaking to a BAcC member local to you and asking their advice face to face for them to assess whether this would be a problem with what they do.
 
We can't really comment on the reiki other than to that once again it may be the individual whose own 'powers' are a little stronger than average. There appears to be no doubt that some people have a natural healing ability, and reactions to what they do may not be totally down to the technique of reiki which, as we understand it, is considered by many to be very gentle.
 
If acupuncture is too painful, for whatever reason, acupressure, moxibustion and tui na, a form of massage which uses the same energetic theory, are likely to be helpful for the very reason that they might well take advantage of your sensitivity to energetic treatment in a positive way. 
 
 

World Health Organisation


The World Health Organisation lists a wide variety of diseases or disorders for which acupuncture therapy has been tested in controlled clinical trials

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