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Research suggests that around one in six couples are likely to experience problems conceiving, with more turning to IVF and donor insemination as alternatives*. While infertility is often thought of as a female problem, only a third of cases can be linked solely to women. Fertility issues affect both male and female partners, and couples are increasingly turning to traditional acupuncture to help them conceive.

In men traditional acupuncture treatment has been shown to influence the quality and quantity of male sperm, improving the motility and count. In women, it can regulate the menstrual cycle and promote ovulation by controlling hormonal imbalances, thus helping to increase the chance of natural conception.


Not only can acupuncture have a positive impact on the patient's mental and emotional state but it has a wide range of other benefits for both male and female partners. Individuals may experience increased energy, inner strength and vitality.

Monday, 04 May 2009 17:49

Our research approach

The Acupuncture Research Resource Centre (ARRC) provides a specialist resource for acupuncture research. ARRC was set up by the BAcC in 1994 and is currently hosted by the Centre for Complementary Healthcare and Integrated Medicine (CCHIM) at Thames Valley University.


Although traditional acupuncture has been studied, tested and refined for centuries in China, huge databases of research remain largely inaccessible outside the Far East and some western commentators question their credibility. But as new research begins to provide quantifiable evidence of traditional acupuncture's efficacy and cost-effectiveness the body of evidence available internationally is growing rapidly.

The BAcC established ARRC to:

  • improve the evidence base and demonstrate the value of traditional acupuncture
  • collect acupuncture research data from available sources
  • develop and apply research methods that are suited to investigating traditional acupuncture
  • increase awareness of the effectiveness of traditional acupuncture by providing good quality information to practitioners, other health service providers, journalists, researchers, government bodies and the public
  • liaise with other researchers and establish a network of research-active practitioners
  • produce review papers on the latest evidence-based clinical trials into the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of specific conditions
  • encourage and support BAcC members' research projects
  • conduct the BAcC's own research projects
  • organise an annual research symposium for healthcare professionals from all backgrounds

For research enquiries please contact Mark Bovey

    Published in public - research

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    World Health Organisation


    The World Health Organisation lists a wide variety of diseases or disorders for which acupuncture therapy has been tested in controlled clinical trials

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