Gavin Erickson

Gavin Erickson

Q: My father is a paraplegic and has been since he was 28. He is now 61 and is suffering with severe hip pain. His hip joint is completely worn. Is acupuncture a suitable treatment for him?

A: This is, we think, really two questions: is it OK for your father as a paraplegic to have treatment, and if so, what are the possible benefits for the problems that he has.

As far as the first is concerned there is absolutely no reason for a person with paraplegia or quadriplegia not to have treatment. Although someone may have lost conscious and voluntary nerve control of the limbs which have been affected all of the autonomic functions continue, and from a Chinese medicine perspective this means that there is energy flow which can be enhanced or corrected by suitable treatment. The main caution with problems like your father's is that there can often be a sensory deficit, so practitioners are always very careful in how they treat. If someone can't say 'stop it, that hurts' there is an increased chance of bruising, and in the case of moxibustion, an increased risk of burns. All professional acupuncturists are trained at undergraduate level in what to do with cases like this.

As far as treating hip problems themselves are concerned, a great deal depends on the level of deterioration in the joint. If the wear is great enough to warrant or nearly warrant a replacement, then we would have to be honest and say that short term pain relief would be the most we would expect to be able to offer. The question would be how much relief and how sustainable it was, and again, to be honest, this may become a question of how affordable treatment is. For people with deep pockets three or four days relief from indefinite weekly treatment may be a good deal. Most of us couldn't afford this, though, and we trust that members do their best in these circumstances to direct people to the most effective and cost-effective means of getting relief, be this herbal medicine or reflexology or any one of dozens of possible complementary medicine solutions.

The best advice that we can give is that your father visits a local BAcC member for advice about what may be possible. Nothing beats actually seeing the problems first hand in order to be able to give an accurate assessment of what may be possible, and most of our colleagues are only to happy to see prospective patients without charge to give them a good idea of what can be done.

We suspect, though, that if the wear is very considerable the amount of relief may be limited, and if someone does think treatment is worthwhile it would be advisable if they offered realistic expectations.

Q: What was the qualification to study for acupunture, and what is the cutoff  to study for acupunture?

A: Your question is a little unclear, but we think we can cover all the bases!

In order to enrol for a training course in acupuncture, most UK students have an A level standard of education which would be the normal entry standard for a university degree course, which many UK courses now are. There are obviously alternative routes depending on the kind of experience and life skills a person has. With a career on acupuncture it helps considerably to have some life experience behind you before starting to train, and many courses will offer partial exemptions and deals for people who can demonstrate that as a mature entrant, for example, they have skills which would enable them to train, even though these may not be reflected in formal qualifications.

As far as the qualifications gained are concerned these are usually licences to practice or diplomas, although the university qualifications will be degrees, usually a Bachelor of Science (BSc).

As far as cut-off is concerned, there often isn't one. In the UK it would actually be in breach of formal guidelines to refuse to take someone on as a student on the grounds of age. All that a training establishment can do is assess whether someone is fit to take the course, not factor in whether or how they can practise the skills learned or the length of time they could possibly practice.

The website of our sister institution, the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board  https://baab.co.uk/ has a wealth of information on training and a career in acupuncture, and we can think of no better resource to which to direct you.

Wednesday, 26 April 2017 16:22

Next steps on the NHS five year forward view

Why is this document important to the profession of traditional acupuncture?

The Next Steps 5yfv document provides a clear summary of the state of NHS provided health and care and an outline plan to make the provision of health and care sustainable in the future.

It could be argued that the thinking contained in the document is not radical enough given the scale of the challenge. The thinking seems to be based on the bio-medical orthodoxy that the NHS has been predicated on for the last 70 years and, while suggesting change, does not challenge this underpinning paradigm.

Eastern medical thinking challenges the western paradigm as it is a total medical system predicated on a holistic patient centred approach that western clinical colleagues are only now slowly adopting.

The Australian Acupuncture and Chinese medicine Association (AACMA) commissioned this review to provide an up to date evidence based guide to the effectiveness of acupuncture using scientifically rigorous methods. Comprehensive acupuncture reviews have been published by the Australian (2010) and US (2013) Departments of Veterans’ Affairs in recent years and this current study built on those by adding data from 2013-16.

These are all, strictly speaking, over-reviews, where published systematic reviews of (largely) randomised controlled trials are collected together and summarised. The results thus reflect the highest level evidence available.

122 different health conditions are represented and the evidence in each of these has been assigned to one of four categories:

Evidence levelNumber of conditions
Positive effect 8
Potential positive effect 38
Unclear/insufficient 71
No evidence of effect 5
Tuesday, 21 March 2017 11:15

Tribute to George Lewith

Professor George Lewith was a qualified physician and general practitioner who had recently retired from clinical practice. He conducted research within primary care and complementary medicine over the last 35 years, largely based at the University of Southampton where he led an internationally respected integrated medicine research group within the medical school’s department of primary medical care.

Professor Lewith combined his scientific interests – including over 300 primary research papers and a series of substantial grants from various charities and the major UK medical research funding bodies – with a busy clinical practice in integrated medicine.

George was a friend not only to all of the acupuncture profession, be it traditional, medical or physiotherapist – he was a member of all three professional bodies – but to the whole of complementary medicine. As well as being a research leader he was also politically savvy, working tirelessly up front and behind the scenes to try to bring acupuncture and CAM further into the mainstream. Nobody did more.

At the same time, both for individuals and organisations, George was always incredibly generous with his time and wise advice, though he could be blunt about woolly thinking. He was the go-to person for any serious media debate, whether written or broadcast, for he was invariably better informed and sharper than his opponents, and could mix it with the best (and worst) of them.

We have lost a guiding hand, a wise counsellor, a dynamic achiever, an all-round good guy, and our world will be a poorer place without him.

Mark Bovey
BAcC Research Manager

Thursday, 02 February 2017 21:12

How acupuncture can treat premature ejaculation

Men's Health magazine item on a new review in the journal Sexual Medicine.

The American College of Physicians recently published a guideline entitled Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians

http://annals.org/aim/article/2603228/noninvasive-treatments-acute-subacute-chronic-low-back-pain-clinical-practice

How very confusing these guidelines are. No sooner does NICE change its mind and give acupuncture the thumbs down for low back pain than up pops the American College of Physicians (the largest medical speciality organisation in the USA) to endorse it. Their conclusions are in line with those of two US government agencies that reviewed the evidence in 2016 and found acupuncture to be an effective treatment for chronic back pain (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Feb 2016; Nahin et al, Sept 2016). How can different guidelines, using much the same data, come up with such different answers? Well, guideline recommendations reflect not only the state of the evidence but also how this evidence is interpreted by the people producing them, and this is subject to all kinds of personal and institutional influences. Hence single guidelines cannot really be trusted: as with builders’ quotes you’d be wise to look at several different ones and get a consensus.

Last week’s popular news story has important implications for guidelines on back pain and puts NICE’s decision on acupuncture into an even worse light. Here is some information you could use to help you to understand, inform, debate, complain or whatever else moves you.