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We would hesitate to use the word 'normal' but it is not unheard of to experience small bumps and itching where needles have been inserted. By far the most common cause is a slight allergic reaction to one of the metals in the needle itself. The stainless steel from which nearly all needles are made often contains traces of other metals, especially nickel, and many people are surprisingly allergic to this. There are also a great many needles which now have a silicone coating to make them easier to insert, and there are a number of people who are surprisingly allergic to this.

Aside from reaction to specific chemicals or metals, there are a number of people who seem for no reason at all to be highly reactive to needles. This can often be useful diagnostic information from a Chinese medicine point of view, and a practitioner can adjust treatment to a degree to address the issue and also try to minimise the effect.

There is no need to be concerned. These sorts of reaction usually last for no more than 24-48 hours, and have usually subsided by then. There is nothing to worry about as far as infection is concerned. Everyone now uses single use disposable needles which are never re-inserted and come already sterilised. 

The best thing to do is to have a chat with your practitioner and get their advice. If the reaction continues beyond 48 hours then it may be worth seeing your GP to get hold of some antihistamine medication and let them have a look at what is going on, but we think that you are unlikely to need to do this. We sincerely hope not anyway|

 

File under general -- general

We think that with the range of symptoms you have, and considering their nature, the first thing to do if you haven't already done so is to visit your GP to see what they make of the signs and symptoms. There are a number of quite serious conditions which can generate symptoms like this, and the first thing we would do if you came to us would be to refer you to your doctor for examination and blood tests. This would eliminate some of the possibilities at a stroke, but may actually lead to an important diagnosis and treatment.

If it turns out that there is nothing to be worried about in conventional medicine terms, then it would be advisable to visit a BAcC member local to you for them to take a look at what is happening. We can think of a number of reasons why the problem might be manifesting, when viewed from our perspective, but without sight of the problem itself we would be reluctant to start making guesses which would in all probability be wrong.

We would also be looking at dietary and environmental factors which might be involved. A surprising number of our patients have allergies and sensitivities of which they are not aware and which cause reactions across the body. The same sometimes happens with cosmetics and detergents. We are sure you have looked at factors like this, but we always check because it can cause these sorts of problems.

Even if there is no obvious cause from a Chinese medicine point of view, we hold the view that putting the system back in balance will always help to reduce symptoms. There is also a very considerable body of evidence about the use of acupuncture for pain relief, and while this can never guarantee that the problem will go it can sometimes offer long stretches without discomfort, for which many patients are very grateful.

As we said, however, this is an unusual problem for which it would be necessary to examine what was happening before venturing a view about how amenable it would be to treatment.

 

q:

Hi. I have a.bmi of 46.and am.currently 22 weeks pregnant and have pgp. Does bmi.effect how acupuncture works?

 

a:

We can say categorically that someone's BMI has no impact at all on whether acupuncture works. From a Chinese medicine perspective the body is seen as a complex flow of energy, called 'qi', and putting a needle into a point will have an effect whether the person's BMI is 15 or 50. Generally speaking there are often energetic reasons why someone gains a great deal of weight, over and above lifestyle considerations and straightforward heredity, and these may have an impact on how much progress someone can make, but that will all be a part of the picture which the practitioner builds up and works with.

Indeed, there is some very good evidence that acupuncture can help with PGP. Studies such as this one published in the BMJ

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC555858/ seem to be very encouraging. In fact the same researcher went on to look at whether there was any potential for harm and concluded that while there may be some minor transient effects there was no serious risk

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18582370

We are by nature a generalist healthcare modality, i.e. we treat the person, not the specific problems they have. In practice, of course, we are all able to go after specific symptoms as well as balancing up the whole system, but we believe that treating a symptom without regard to the whole is leaving things half finished. This means that we regard all of our members as capable of treating any patient who comes to them. However, we are close to reaching agreement on the treatment of pregnant women as an area of expert practice for which we have recognised postgraduate training. In the circumstances it would be highly advisable to go to someone who has had this kind of training and who has spent more time looking at the specific issues of pregnancy.

Unfortunately we haven't signed this work off yet, but we are pretty sure that if you type into google your place of residence, acupuncture and pregnancy it will generate a number of hits of our members who specialise in fertility and pregnancy issues. Failing that you could always call a local BAcC member and ask them to point you towards someone locally who has these skills. We are always very keen to see patients get the exact care they need.
 

 

 

 

 

Q: I have been for 3 acupuncture session over the last week. I am going for various reasons, CFS/ME, anxiety and the flu amongst some other moans and groans. After the first session I was pretty ill with indigestion and nausea and aching. Nothing much after the second session but a headache. After the third session however I am feeling very strange, I feel almost out of it for lack of a better description. I cant seem to get myself to focus at work no matter what I do and had a panick attack which I don't usually suffer from. I am spaced and feel removed. I am also a bit nauseous. Is this normal and has anyone else described this. When will it pass? I need to work and I am getting anxious. Is it a good sign.

A: It's always very difficult for us to comment when we do not have a full case history in front of us, and better still, an actual patient. We are always aware that if we take issue with what someone has done without knowing the full picture we might make an unfair criticism for which we might be held to account.

What we do wonder, though, is whether it is entirely wise to do as much treatment in a week to someone with a background of MS/CFS who has reacted very strongly to the initial session. In people whose immune systems have been weakened by long term illness it is always wisest to start slowly with the strength of treatment and to row back if they throw quite severe reactions. This is not a universal rule, but it is impossible to tell after a single session whether the effects are a clearing of imbalances or an adverse reaction to treatment.

We suppose that since the second treatment didn't really cause anything over-dramatic the practitioner decided that it was the former, a mild-ish reaction which could indicate the beginning of the process of healing, and treated again. In the event, the further reactions after the third session might call for a review of that judgement.

It is highly likely that if you have been slightly overtreated the effects will not last that long. Acupuncture is a remarkably safe therapy, and the only serious incidents involve the penetration of organs with needles, and these occasions are very rare. If someone has a strong reaction to treatment then it normally lasts no more than 48 hours at most, and usually less. We suspect that by the time you receive this you will already be feeling a great deal more 'normal'.

It may, of course, be that the problems are not at all connected to the treatment; CFS issues can often come up at any time. However, it does look like the treatment is implicated, so it is really important that you discuss this with your practitioner in determining how to proceed. This might mean less frequent or less powerful treatment, and we are sure that a properly trained and qualified practitioner will listen to your concerns and respond accordingly.

We did say, though, that without looking at you and the case history we could not say for sure whether the practitioner was in any way at fault, and it may well be that he or she is surprised by this outcome and well able to respond positively to the feedback you are providing. Treatment is sometimes like a voyage of discovery where a practitioner can only find out what the best strategy is by setting off as normal and then reacting if the signs are that the treatment is too much for the patient. The practitioner may well have made a judgement that you needed frequent treatment based on your case notes, but your reactions might suggest that this is not the best way forward.

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