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Q: My meibomiem glands are blocked causing swelling below my eye. Can acupuncture unblock these?

A: If you search the internet for problems with the meibomian glands and the use of acupuncture you will come across the occasional study like this one

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3355143/

which is cited quite frequently in the treatment of dry eye syndrome. There are a couple of others of a similar nature, but the main concern is with a functional disturbance in the work of the glands as a contributor to the symptom rather than a straightforward blockage.

Of course, when you talk to acupuncture practitioners about blockages they tend to light up. Our work, after all is based on an understanding of the body as a complex flow of energies, and using needles to unblock areas which have become stuck is very much a part of what we do. When someone reports an area of the body where things have become 'stuck' we always feel that the use of needles may well help to unstick them.

However, we are always looking at the person as a whole, not simply the symptoms which they have, and an important concern is that the symptoms is not the tip of a much larger iceberg. Although symptoms like yours tend to be local rather than systemic, there are times when a general change in the character or viscosity of body fluids can cause accumulations in areas where the physical conduits or channels are narrow, and an experienced practitioner will want to understand your local symptom in its wider context before giving you a prognosis.

The best advice that we can give is that you visit a local BAcC member and let them have a look at the problem face to face. This will give them a much better idea of what may be possible than we can offer at a distance. The one caveat with problems like this, though, is that people can sometimes carry on with treatment far longer than the results justify. If it is a simple and local blockage there should be changes within a session or two. If there aren't then it is worth drawing a line very quickly before committing large sums of money getting nowhere, unless the practitioner is absolutely sure that there is a wider pattern which underlies and sustains the symptom.

Q: Can acupuncture help anosmia?

A: We have been asked this question a number of times, and our answer has always been:

Google is a massively powerful search facility, and if you google 'acupuncture anosmia' it looks as though there are a number of studies which give cause for hope. If you look carefully, however, you will see that there is but one study http://aim.bmj.com/content/21/4/153.long which is frequently quoted, generating a number of secondary references. This study, what we call an n=1 case study because it is the report of a single case, is important because it suggests that there may be something worth looking at in the use of acupuncture treatment. The weakness of n=1 studies, of course, is that they are not designed to test acupuncture, and the positive outcome could have arisen for any number of reasons, especially since the case study can provide no evidence for the sudden onset of the problem.

That is not to say that acupuncture treatment is not worth trying. The use of Traditional Chinese medicine involves a great deal of questioning and examination to determine the state and flow of the energies of the body, called 'qi', and the state of the organs which are responsible for all of the functional aspects of the body. Even where there is no obvious cause from a conventional medical point of view, it is rare for a symptom to stand alone in Chinese medicine other than where it derives from a blockage. In this case, if the blockage is removed, the function is restored. We strongly suspect that this is what happened in the case study, and blockages of this kind can sometimes occur for no obvious reason.

Generally speaking, though, a pattern of disharmony will generate a number of symptoms or changes in function, not all of which are clinically significant from a conventional perspective, and these may point t specific imbalances affecting Organic function. Note that we capitalise the word 'Organ' - what we understand by this in Chinese medicine is a great deal more than a physical unit in the body. The Chinese understanding of an Organ embraced functions on all levels, body mind and spirit, and when practised properly Chinese medicine can legitimately claim to be holistic.

The best advice we can give is that you visit a BAcC member local to you for advice on whether they think that acupuncture treatment may be of benefit, and to discuss briefly with you the other aspects of your health which may indicate wider patterns which in turn may link to your problem. That is not to say that there may not be as simple a treatment as the one described in the paper, and one of the points used has the Chinese name 'Welcome Fragrance' suggesting that it may have a direct bearing on the sense of smell. You would certainly not do any harm. However, we would be more likely to look at this as a functional disturbance and be looking at other factors in the system which might point to a treatable pattern.

There is not much more that we can say than this.  We have re-checked the research databases, and there has been nothing new to report. However, we have come across a couple of anecdotal accounts from colleagues, so we would not say that treatment definitely could not help, but that it would be unusual if it did.

Of course, a great deal does depend on the reasons why the condition may have developed, which is why we would always recommending talking to someone face to face. This may offer useful clues which could increase the chances of some improvement if the causes were more physical than neurological.

Q: Is Accupuncture beneficial in the treatment of Tinnitus?

A: We tend to be very conservative in the advice we give about tinnitus. One recent response said:

We used to be a great deal more downbeat about the treatment of tinnitus than we are now because our experience in practice was that it could prove intractable to treatment. However, as our factsheet shows

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/tinnitus.html

and as some recent personal experience in clinic has shown too, there may be some hope.

The problem with measuring the success of treatment for tinnitus is that its appearance and disappearance can be entirely random. If you read the tinnitus association's magazine you will see stories along the lines of 'I tried everything and then x worked' and an equal number of stories which say 'I had tinnitus for five years and then one day it just went.'  Research trials tend to be quite reliable - it would be a remarkable coincidence if half the trial participants experienced a spontaneous improvement - but one-off cases could be a coincidence, with acupuncture just happening to be the therapy of choice when the change happened.

The available evidence, however, suggests that it might be worth a try with the proviso that progress is reviewed at regular intervals, and some kind of objective measure can be found, i.e. how much it interferes with a radio set at a particular level. It might also repay investigation of what makes it worse and what makes it better. A long n-1 case study this expert conducted had very little impact on the condition but did increase the sufferer's ability to deal with it.

The best advice is to visit a BAcC member local to you  for an informal face to face assessment of what may be possible. There are one or two clearly recognisable syndromes within Chinese medicine which might offer considerable confidence that muting the problem may be possible, but even a general balancing of the system may bear fruit.


Invariably we check for more evidence when we are asked a question to which we have responded before, and the evidence trail for the fact sheet stops some time ago. We found a number of small studies like this one

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26747258

which seem on the face of it to encourage the belief that there is a recognised connection between acupuncture treatment and symptom relief. There is also a systematic review, a 'trial of all trials' beloved of researchers because it aggregates to a much more powerful study than the individual ones.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3493359/

This draws the usual sorts of conclusion about the need for more and better trials, but the authors do conclude that acupuncture is worth trying as a safe alternative which seemed to have shown some success in addressing the problem.

The advice we gave before, though, holds good. Each case is unique and different, as is each treatment plan, and the best advice you can get will always come from someone who can see your problem in its overall context.

Q: Hello,

I am 26 years old. I think I have ovulation bleeding. My last period is 17 Apr to 23 Apr. I had brown and red discharge (a bit only) from 29 Apr to 9 May. This few days there are more red blood discharge. What shall I eat or drink?

My periods are normal (a bit heavy on the first 2 days)(it is always 3-7 days late). Sometimes I have mild or sharp abdominal pain on the first day. I often have white discharge.

Thank you. 

A: There is a fair bit of evidence that acupuncture treatment can address issues like irregular, heavy or painful periods, as well as addressing some of the issues which commonly lead to discharge. Our factsheets on a number of subjects, and especially

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/dysmenorrhoea.html

identify a considerable body of evidence for the successful use of acupuncture. It is not at all uncommon for us to see many patients with menstrual problems. The evidence is not conclusive to the point that we could guarantee positive results, but we are confident that there will be some degree of improvement.

However, we would always in cases of unusual patterns of bleeding such as yours ask first whether you had seen your doctor or presented to a hospital outpatients department/well woman's clinic. Any unexpected or unusual bleeding is regarded as a 'red flag', a sign that that part of the system needs to be checked urgently. In the majority of cases there is nothing to worry about, but there can be important problems which might need addressing and which would fall outside what we could offer, so we always insist on getting this first line of checking done.

If you have already seen your doctor and been reassured that there is nothing to worry about, then by all means use acupuncture to try to bring things back to normal. Visiting a local BAcC member for advice would be a good option. Most of our colleagues are only too happy to give up a little time without charge to assess whether treatment would be a good idea, and this allows them to see the problems prospective patients have in their wider context.

Q: I have struggled with my neck and shoulders for years and have recently started to get tension head aches. Massages have helped in the past but not so much anymore. My posture isn't great so I know this is the main trigger and I also work in an office so sit at a desk for 8 plus hours a day. Would acupuncture help me?   Thanks in advance

A: We often come across people who are pretty much spot on about the causes of their problems - posture, work-related stress and sedentary nature - but are not in a very good position to do much about it. This is a problem for us as acupuncturists in terms of the ''two steps forward, one and half steps backward' of a great deal of the treatment we do. We obviously believe that we can help problems like neck pain and headache, and the evidence supporting this is pretty good, as our factsheets show:

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/4076-neck-pain.html

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/headache.html

It falls a little short of an absolute recommendation but this is more to do with the vagaries of methodological requirements than the treatment itself. These remain some of the more common conditions for which people seek our help.

We suspect that the real issue here is how a practitioner might work with you to manage the causes of your problems. There are a number of exercises and self-help routines which people can use, both within acupuncture and within associated disciplines, and many of our patients find these very beneficial, although we have to be honest and say that it takes a bit of nagging on occasion. We know that employers have statutory duties to offer staff members breaks when they are machine or desk bound, but we know equally well that it is a brave employee these days who insists on this. There are a number of meditation and mindfulness programmes which can be of great help, and other people use NLP as a means of anchoring relaxed states and breaking the cycle of tension.

We think the best thing to do, though, would be to visit a local BAcC member, possibly for a chat or even for a couple of sessions to explore how much change the acupuncture treatment seems able to achieve. If this can be targeted for a time when you have some R and R ahead, like a Bank Holiday weekend or holiday, so much the better. This will give a very clear indication of the possible benefits.

Much of the problem stems from blockage and stagnation of the energy, and acupuncture treatment can be hugely effective in relaxing people. The point, though, is to stop them tensing up again while they do what they have always done.

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