Latest posts are at the bottom of this page.
Use the filter buttons above to help find answers - click on the boxes

Recent answers

Q: Is Accupuncture beneficial in the treatment of Tinnitus?

A: We tend to be very conservative in the advice we give about tinnitus. One recent response said:

We used to be a great deal more downbeat about the treatment of tinnitus than we are now because our experience in practice was that it could prove intractable to treatment. However, as our factsheet shows

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/tinnitus.html

and as some recent personal experience in clinic has shown too, there may be some hope.

The problem with measuring the success of treatment for tinnitus is that its appearance and disappearance can be entirely random. If you read the tinnitus association's magazine you will see stories along the lines of 'I tried everything and then x worked' and an equal number of stories which say 'I had tinnitus for five years and then one day it just went.'  Research trials tend to be quite reliable - it would be a remarkable coincidence if half the trial participants experienced a spontaneous improvement - but one-off cases could be a coincidence, with acupuncture just happening to be the therapy of choice when the change happened.

The available evidence, however, suggests that it might be worth a try with the proviso that progress is reviewed at regular intervals, and some kind of objective measure can be found, i.e. how much it interferes with a radio set at a particular level. It might also repay investigation of what makes it worse and what makes it better. A long n-1 case study this expert conducted had very little impact on the condition but did increase the sufferer's ability to deal with it.

The best advice is to visit a BAcC member local to you  for an informal face to face assessment of what may be possible. There are one or two clearly recognisable syndromes within Chinese medicine which might offer considerable confidence that muting the problem may be possible, but even a general balancing of the system may bear fruit.


Invariably we check for more evidence when we are asked a question to which we have responded before, and the evidence trail for the fact sheet stops some time ago. We found a number of small studies like this one

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26747258

which seem on the face of it to encourage the belief that there is a recognised connection between acupuncture treatment and symptom relief. There is also a systematic review, a 'trial of all trials' beloved of researchers because it aggregates to a much more powerful study than the individual ones.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3493359/

This draws the usual sorts of conclusion about the need for more and better trials, but the authors do conclude that acupuncture is worth trying as a safe alternative which seemed to have shown some success in addressing the problem.

The advice we gave before, though, holds good. Each case is unique and different, as is each treatment plan, and the best advice you can get will always come from someone who can see your problem in its overall context.

Q: Hello,

I am 26 years old. I think I have ovulation bleeding. My last period is 17 Apr to 23 Apr. I had brown and red discharge (a bit only) from 29 Apr to 9 May. This few days there are more red blood discharge. What shall I eat or drink?

My periods are normal (a bit heavy on the first 2 days)(it is always 3-7 days late). Sometimes I have mild or sharp abdominal pain on the first day. I often have white discharge.

Thank you. 

A: There is a fair bit of evidence that acupuncture treatment can address issues like irregular, heavy or painful periods, as well as addressing some of the issues which commonly lead to discharge. Our factsheets on a number of subjects, and especially

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/dysmenorrhoea.html

identify a considerable body of evidence for the successful use of acupuncture. It is not at all uncommon for us to see many patients with menstrual problems. The evidence is not conclusive to the point that we could guarantee positive results, but we are confident that there will be some degree of improvement.

However, we would always in cases of unusual patterns of bleeding such as yours ask first whether you had seen your doctor or presented to a hospital outpatients department/well woman's clinic. Any unexpected or unusual bleeding is regarded as a 'red flag', a sign that that part of the system needs to be checked urgently. In the majority of cases there is nothing to worry about, but there can be important problems which might need addressing and which would fall outside what we could offer, so we always insist on getting this first line of checking done.

If you have already seen your doctor and been reassured that there is nothing to worry about, then by all means use acupuncture to try to bring things back to normal. Visiting a local BAcC member for advice would be a good option. Most of our colleagues are only too happy to give up a little time without charge to assess whether treatment would be a good idea, and this allows them to see the problems prospective patients have in their wider context.

Q: I have struggled with my neck and shoulders for years and have recently started to get tension head aches. Massages have helped in the past but not so much anymore. My posture isn't great so I know this is the main trigger and I also work in an office so sit at a desk for 8 plus hours a day. Would acupuncture help me?   Thanks in advance

A: We often come across people who are pretty much spot on about the causes of their problems - posture, work-related stress and sedentary nature - but are not in a very good position to do much about it. This is a problem for us as acupuncturists in terms of the ''two steps forward, one and half steps backward' of a great deal of the treatment we do. We obviously believe that we can help problems like neck pain and headache, and the evidence supporting this is pretty good, as our factsheets show:

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/4076-neck-pain.html

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/headache.html

It falls a little short of an absolute recommendation but this is more to do with the vagaries of methodological requirements than the treatment itself. These remain some of the more common conditions for which people seek our help.

We suspect that the real issue here is how a practitioner might work with you to manage the causes of your problems. There are a number of exercises and self-help routines which people can use, both within acupuncture and within associated disciplines, and many of our patients find these very beneficial, although we have to be honest and say that it takes a bit of nagging on occasion. We know that employers have statutory duties to offer staff members breaks when they are machine or desk bound, but we know equally well that it is a brave employee these days who insists on this. There are a number of meditation and mindfulness programmes which can be of great help, and other people use NLP as a means of anchoring relaxed states and breaking the cycle of tension.

We think the best thing to do, though, would be to visit a local BAcC member, possibly for a chat or even for a couple of sessions to explore how much change the acupuncture treatment seems able to achieve. If this can be targeted for a time when you have some R and R ahead, like a Bank Holiday weekend or holiday, so much the better. This will give a very clear indication of the possible benefits.

Much of the problem stems from blockage and stagnation of the energy, and acupuncture treatment can be hugely effective in relaxing people. The point, though, is to stop them tensing up again while they do what they have always done.

Q: I finish law university but I want to become professional acupuncturist. I would like to know which schools offered the best knowledge which can be approved anywhere especially in Europe.  I would prefer to learn it in China or Japan but if there is any good school in Europe It can be my choice as well.

A: We can only really comment on the schools of which we are aware in the UK. The ones of which we have direct knowledge are those accredited by the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board, whose website https://baab.co.uk/ offers a wealth of useful information about training in traditional acupuncture in the UK. Graduates of accredited course have automatic eligibility to enter the BAcC, subject to acceptable health and criminal record checks.

The issue for you, though, is that while there is no statutory regulation of acupuncture in the UK, which means that people can practise with all sorts of level of qualification under what is called common law, this is not the case across Europe. Some countries, like France and Italy, still technically regard acupuncture practised bu non-doctors a criminal act, while others like Germany and Holland, have secondary requirements for anyone wanting to operate as a healthcare practitioner. As such there are no qualifications which guarantee that someone can move freely around Europe as an acupuncture practitioner. The same would apply even if you travelled to China or Japan to get your qualification. In the BAcC we have no reciprocal recognition of qualifications with other countries, and we interview every candidate for entry who is not a UK graduate. We believe the same applies elsewhere.

It may well be that you have to work back to front - decide where you might want to work and then investigate what the baseline qualification is for these countries, and also whether you would be able to get  away with practise as a non-doctor. In France, for example, we know of few prosecutions, even though many traditional practitioners work there, and when people are caught the fines they get are strangely equivalent to what the registration fees would have been had they been official.

We do belong to a European network, the ETCMA http://www.etcma.org/, and it may be possible to use the contact details from here to ask member colleagues what currently applies in their countries, and what the relationship is between training and registration.

Q: I have tennis elbow in both arms the right arm is worse than the left.ive had 4 treatments now which lasts half an hour each time. After I have a 15 min massage the massage is so rough that the pain wants to make me cry. I was told I have bad circulation and that's why the massage is rough. So then I spend 4 days in pain after getting over the experience to go back 3 days later to have it all over again. The problem is the gentleman doesn't speak much English so I find it hard to ask him questions and get answers  I'm not seeing any progress at the moment  my question is is this normal for me to still have pain and should the massage be so vigorous?

A: We are sorry to hear of your experience.  It certainly does not help that the practitioner is not able to communicate very easily. However, we have to say that you need to be aware that you are in charge in the treatment room, and that the practitioner can only work with your consent. If you decide that the massage is too rough and ask him to stop it, then stop it he must or be guilty of common assault. It is then his problem/challenge to use his skills to circumvent the problem of not being able to get the qi moving by vigorous massage. There are always ways!

Should there be progress by now? That is a very difficult question to answer. It depends a great deal on the severity of the initial problem. Our factsheet has some reasonable evidence for the benefit of acupuncture treatment

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/tennis-elbow.html

but there are widely different degrees of the problem, and in some cases it can take half a dozen sessions to get the energy moving and undo the stagnation of the energy.

However, that said, the treatment should not be causing pain four days later, and unless there are stunningly good clinical results to back up continuation it would seem entirely legitimate to question whether the course of treatment is really going anywhere. There has to come a point after about four or five sessions where one can say with some certainty whether it looks like the treatment will succeed, and if it doesn't then it is important to draw a line in the sand and stop.

It is not our job to talk one of our possible members out of a job, but you need to discuss this situation with him, and if the answer doesn't help you then perhaps you might need to re-consider whether he is the best practitioner for you. We have always been very insistent that a practitioner must have sufficiently good English to address a patient's concerns because we are all too well aware of the consequences of people feeling that they haven't been heard.

And the bottom line is that it's a buyer's market. If you aren't happy with the treatment there are probably a great many other practitioners close by to whom you can transfer.

Post a question

If you have any questions about acupuncture, browse our archive or ask an expert.

Ask an expert

BAcC Factsheets

Research based factsheets have been prepared for over 60 conditions especially for this website

Browse the facts

In the news

Catch up with the latest news on acupuncture in the national media

Latest news