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Restless leg syndrome is awful, as this 'expert' knows from personal experience back in the 80s when nothing, but nothing, would make the problem relent. It is nowgaining recognition as a diagnosable problem, with a new name(!), and there are a number of treatment options which are being explored. A review article http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3101885/ cites several of these, and the one acupuncture review this in turn cites

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18843716

mentions two to three studies which are interesting but generally concludes that the majority of studies are too small and not methodologically sound enough to draw firm conclusions.

From a Chinese medicine perspective, however, there are entirely different ways of looking at the balance of energies within the body which can sometimes make sense of problems such as these within a theoretical structure which is quite different from western medicine. Problems like restless legs syndrome, where the leg feels as though it is 'over-energised' can sometimes make sense in a system of thought which looks at the free flow of energy within the system, and tries to understand the pathologies which arise in terms of excesses and deficiencies, and especially blockages. A skilled practitioner should very quickly be able to make sense of the energy flows within the system, and be able to offer you some sense of whether there is something which is treatable.

Even where this is not the case it is important to mention that the older theories of Chinese medicine were primarily aimed at balancing the whole system, seeing symptoms only as alarm bells, not the problem itself. Working in this kind of way our members very often have an effect on problems without necessarily being able to give a highly specific audit trail of what is causing something to go wrong.

We have not come across much in the way of new research, although another small study published early this year (2015)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4339862/

repeats the general pattern of significant effects but small study sizes which means that we cannot give a more unqualified recommendation.

As far as motor axonal neuropathy is concerned, there is very little focused research on this specific presentation of peripheral neuropathy. There is a systematic review published earlier this year

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28112552

which embraces a number of papers about neuropathies very similar to axonal neuropathy, but nothing specifically about it. Most studies of this kind tend to be very small, and inevitably the conclusion is that more studies on a larger scale would be necessary. The main question which is left unanswered is 'who will pay for them?'

If you are considering acupuncture treatment for the problem the best advice we can give is that you visit a local BAcC member to ask for a brief face to face chat about what may be possible. It follows from what we have said before that each case is unique and different, and a face to face assessment is the only way to get a specific answer about what you might expect. Many practitioners are happy to give up a small amount of time without charge to prospective patients to make this kind of assessment.

As far as we are aware, the BAcC retains all the materials relating to complaints about a practitioner's conduct or behaviour indefinitely. There are very few each year, so there is no logistical problem about keeping them. The logic behind retaining them indefinitely is that if a pattern emerges over time then even where a complaint is not pursued or no ruling is made. 

The only minor complication would arise if the complaint were not to be about the conduct or performance of a practitioner but about the consequences of a treatment, i.e. the basis for an insurance claim. Along with most other healthcare professions members of the BAcC are required to retain their treatment notes for a minimum of seven years (or seven years after the age of majority for a child under sixteen, so theoretically as much as twenty three years) for insurance purposes. The insurers rarely have claims arising after three years from point of treatment, and although the insurance cover lasts indefinitely if the member was insured at the time, there are a number of data protection issues about holding on to historical information about past patients.

This might mean that although the BAcC may have a record of a complaint eight years ago and all of the attendant statements from the time, the primary record may no longer exist. In most cases this is not so; unless we are pressed for storage space we tend to hold on to files for much longer because people do return after a decade for treatment. There does come a point, though, where it is unreasonable to be holding personal information taken a very long time ago, and where there can be no real justification for hanging on to material.

We hope this answers your question. If you wish to re-visit the matter then you can always contact our Ethics Secretary on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for specific advice.

A great deal depends on whether the damage to the nerve had become permanent before the operation successfully dealt with the disc herniation. It is unlikely that the continuing numbness is a consequence of the operation itself unless it was already impinged and then further damaged by the surgery. If this is the case then the evidence for nerve regeneration through acupuncture is not at all convincing and related mainly to experiments on animals. From a conventional medicine point of view unless there is an obvious site of inflammation, or the operation itself has left scar tissue which is impinging the nerve it is probable that this may be permanent.

However, from a Chinese medicine perspective it may just be possible that what you are experiencing as numbness may derive from changes in the flow of energy caused by first the herniation and then the operation itself. We are not in the business of giving people unrealistic expectations but we have come across situations, especially post-operatively, where changes in the flow of energy, called 'qi' in Chinese medicine, can manifest as a loss of sensation. Reinstating this flow can sometimes start to restore some of the sensitivity of the tissues.

This would be a bit of a long shot, but may nonetheless be worth trying. The best advice we can give, and which applies particularly in your case, is to visit a local BAcC member for an informal assessment of what may be possible based on physical sight of the problem. Most members offer some time without charge to prospective patients to check whether acupuncture is the best option, and if they find that there is a strong correlation between your areas of numbness and acupuncture channels it may convince them that treatment would be worth trying. 

As you might expect there is very little published research on the treatment of lichen planopilaris (LPP) with acupuncture. We are sure that there are many reasons for this, not least of which is that it is quite a rare condition and collecting enough cases for a study may prove difficult. There isn't even a great deal of published research on the commoner varieties of alopecia.

From a conventional medicine perspective treatment, usually heavily steroid led, is aimed at reducing or slowing down the spread of the condition by reducing the inflammatory responses which characterise its spread. We suspect that insofar as we use acupuncture to treat many forms of inflammation there may be some possibility of replicating or augmenting the effect of conventional treatment.

However, we are always keen to point out that the Chinese medicine perspective is a very different one from what most people think of as medicine. The idea of named conditions is not really at the heart of the system, and each patient is seen as a unique combination of energies whose patterns, rhythm and flow are the basis for understanding why symptoms appear. The blockages and changes of flow which create symptoms are sometimes local and directly related to the problem as it appears, but more often than not there are systemic problems which need to be addressed for local problems to have any chance of being properly removed.

The language of Chinese medicine is often quite literal, and will talk of Heat, Cold and Damp as factors within the system, so someone with an inflammatory response would be seen as manifesting Dry Heat or Damp Heat, and the treatment would be aimed at expelling this, and at the same time treating the system to ensure that it does not flare up again. This may all sound a little airy fairy but with 2500 years of history behind it Chinese medicine is a very sophisticated diagnostic and treatment tool.

We often find that with skin problems Chinese Herbal Medicine can be used to great effect, and BAcC members who are also members of the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine may be the ones to approach for advice. Most RCHM members belong to the BAcC, so using their practitioner search function will almost certainly generate a hit near you. We always advise people to visit a practitioner for an informal chat because as is obvious from what we have said about individual treatment there really is no substitute for having a direct look at a problem. Most members are happy to give up a little time to prospective patients without charge to assess what the best treatment options may be.

We think, though, that you might have to accept that where hair has been lost the chances of regrowth are slim, and that the best treatment might be able to achieve would be a slowing down of the disease progress together with a lessening of some of the discomforts associated with it. 

We are sorry to hear that you are experiencing what sound like very unpleasant side-effects from a treatment.

We are not sure from your email what the provenance of your practitioner is. The technique you describe is called percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation, about which you can read here:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ipg362/chapter/1-Guidance

It is not really an acupuncture technique as such, at least it certainly is not a part of the ancient traditional Chinese medicine which we all practise. It is a modern technique using needles as electrodes which, as is often the case in modern developments of acupuncture, is described as working 'by a mechanism which is not yet properly understood.' It may well be that a traditional acupuncturist has decided to add this to their repertoire, but it is not a part of our core training.

As far as your strange symptoms are concerned, in conventional medicine it might be possible to make a case for some of the local ones, i.e. pain or tingling in the immediate area of the electrodes, because there may have actually been irritation of the nerves or small bruises which have consolidated to generate the symptoms from which you suffer. However, there would be very little that western medicine could do to explain why that should be generating sensations in your left arm and in your head.

From a traditional acupuncture perspective it might just be possible that the stimulation has had an effect on the channels of energy, and there are certainly internal connections between hand, foot and head which might explain what is going on. However, the mystery here would be what was causing the connection to be made several days after the treatment. If there are after effects or adverse effects after treatment they are generally immediate and subside within the first 48 hours. It is rather unusual for something to kick in three or fours days after the event and then to generate something which we call propagated needle sensation at this stage. This kind of effect takes a great deal of work to generate, and it is difficult to see what could be replicating this so long after a session.

Of course, we do have to bear in mind that there are sometimes occasions when a new symptom arises after, but not because of, a treatment. With four million treatments a year this can always be a possibility. The first thing we always advise, and what applies especially in your case, is to seek medical advice to find out exactly what is happening. This may take a referral to a neurologist, but since it sounds like a neurological effect getting advice here may well establish causation, i.e. whether the treatment actually caused what it happening. In an event this will point the way towards making it go away.

It might also be worthwhile talking to the practitioner about what they have done. They will know better than anyone else what points and techniques they have used, and may be able to make sense of what has happened to you.

It may be comforting to be aware that very few serious adverse events take place each year, and where these do happen from acupuncture treatment it is usually from penetration of an organ or direct physical damage. The remainder tend to be short-lived and transient, and we are confident that if this is really an effect of treatment it will subside relatively quickly. 



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