Ask an expert - about acupuncture - side effects

132 questions

What you report is a little unusual but not unknown. We have come across patients who have been treated for several sessions and only then shown a reaction to needles. Sometimes there is an obvious cause - change of needles, slightly deeper insertion in muscular areas - but most often it is an unpredictable reaction. The only concern would be if the blister/bite like bumps were a potential source of infection if they became open, or if they increased in severity. At this point a practitioner might just refer on to a GP for an onward referral to a dermatologist. In the vast majority of cases, however, this tends to be a short-lived phenomenon.

The other issue to consider is whether the reaction is not a physical one but a sign of some kind of energetic release. It is very much a part of Chinese medicine theory that some of the physical problems which affect the body are the result of pathogens entering the body or pathogens which have built up in the superficial tissues because of blockage or excess. When treatment 'bites' this can sometimes cause the skin and superficial tissue to become quite reactive, as well as in some cases generating rashes and areas of heat. If this is a treatment reaction it will be short-lived; the majority of what we call adverse events are transient and minor.

The best thing to do is to ask your practitioner if there has been any change of equipment or style from the first to the second session, and if so revert to the former. If not, then it is simply a matter of keeping an eye on the small bumps to ensure that they recede as swiftly as they came. We have come across patients in whom this is a benign and continuing reaction to treatment, and as long as it is managed with common sense there won't be a problem.

It is not unusual for people to experience a slight return of some earlier symptoms when they begin acupuncture treatment. This is more often the case with long standing chronic problems like migraine or skin disorders, and we always warn new patients that it is possible they may experience a slight return, sometimes quite extreme, of problems which they may have had many years before. Indeed, in some other similar professions this is known as the law of cure, a return of earlier disorders in reverse chronological order.

The energetic reasons for this are quite complex, and not all practitioners agree on the exact causation. Most take the view, though, especially with traumatic injury, that when it happens it allows some form of disruption to travel into the system and become dormant within the body, so that when the body starts to heal it is then expelled in a similar way to the way it was experienced when it happened. Chinese medicine abounds with expressions like 'releasing the interior' or 'expelling a pathogen' and such like, and they all carry a sense of kicking things out of the system.If this is the case for you, then it is a very heartening response, especially if the process also gets rid of any residual tendency to fibromyalgia at the same time. However, when people get these kinds of reactions we are always careful not to be blase and assume that it is a positive outcome. The key element of a 'good' return of symptoms is that they are usually short lived. If the symptoms return for an extended period of time, then they need to be looked at carefully, especially if they were associated with an accident less than a month ago. These may still be a response to what happened then, and it would be remiss of a practitioner not to point someone back to their GP if the problem persisted for a week or more.Hopefully by the time you read this the pains will have subsided and gone, but if they continue it would be worthwhile to contact your practitioner to discuss what to do and to arrange an appointment with your doctor as a precaution.
This is an interesting question and comes hot on the heels of one answered earlier today about whether a certain type of ear piercing could have an effect on migraines as a form of acupuncture. The answer to this question was 'not really', and at first glance we would have to say that the same sort of overall logic applies in your case - there are unlikely to be unwanted acupuncture-type treatments caused by the insertion of hypodermic needles. Insofar as this is extremely unlikely to happen we wouldn't really consider it necessary to isolate 'safe areas' for someone.

Indeed, one of the main problems which bedevils attempts to test whether acupuncture works by the use of what is called 'sham' acupuncture points, i.e. places not recognised in classical texts, is that from an energetic point of view there aren't lines of points traversing a kind of inert space. What you really have are places where the energy is very lively and contactable, the points, and areas where the energy is not quite so active. This means that a needle off piste, as it were, is still going to have an effect. In that sense it means that there is no neutral place to stick a hypodermic.There is a great deal more that we could say about intention and technique - it isn't just a matter of finding a specific place and putting a needle in - but the bottom line is that we would have serious doubts that you could be self-treating by accident in giving yourself injections. However, if you wanted to play very safe there are innumerable charts of acupuncture points on the internet showing the flows of the four main channels through the abdomen. It should be fairly straightforward to identify area where the energy is less focused. If it feels more reassuring to inject here, then we can see no harm in so doing.
We have very good evidence in the form of several published surveys and research studies that acupuncture treatment is not only safe but also that the majority of side effects are transient, minor and tend to disappear within 48 hours. However, that does not mean that there are not occasionally more serious side effects.

Where the majority of serious side effects occur, and these remain very rare, it is most often because of a direct effect of the needling in the form of a pneumothorax or nerve damage. We do hear of the occasional case of both, and the BAcC has had to deal two or three such cases in the last decade. Injuries such as you have experienced are much more rare, where the damage arises not from the needling itself but from a physical reaction to the needling, like fainting from needling and then getting bruises from falling.We suspect that your physiotherapist has called it correctly insofar as the reaction to the needle insertion has caused the twisting of the lower back and induced sciatica. Strong reactions to needling are possible, and some people do have electric shock sensations as a genuine consequence of mobilising the energy. This is generally recognisable because it does not fall along nerve pathways as understood in conventional medicine. If the problem has been induced by a kind of physical twist injury it is almost certain that it will resolve quite quickly. Further treatment would help, but we can quite easily imagine that this is not likely to be an option for you.As far as the second occasion is concerned, we suspect that the practitioner may have under-estimated your sensitivity to treatment and used points which do tend to have a higher risk of generating physically painful reactions,. Clearly it would not be fair for us to comment on someone's work without knowing a great deal more  of the case history, and we have all experienced cases where someone has had unexpected and unpleasant reactions to points which we have used thousands of times. The skill of the practitioner lies in then adjusting the treatment to a pitch which the patient can bear by reducing the number of needles, reducing the depth of insertion and the amount of needle manipulation.Where people do have an unpleasant experience of treatment it can induce a kind of 'shock' which may well undo some of the good work already done and cause the overall pattern to become a little disturbed again, bringing back symptoms which had been under control. Our experience, however, is that these episodes rarely result in a permanent loss of progress, and the system usually restores to the point which it had reached before.We are very sorry to hear of your experience, and equally sorry to hear that acupuncture treatment is unlikely to be an option for you in future.  There are many variations within the 2500 year tradition which use minimally invasive techniques, but we can understand how this would probably not be reassurance enough. We do hope that you manage to regain the place which you had reached before this episode occurred, and that you manage to continue to progress from there.

Q: I have been for 3 acupuncture session over the last week. I am going for various reasons, CFS/ME, anxiety and the flu amongst some other moans and groans. After the first session I was pretty ill with indigestion and nausea and aching. Nothing much after the second session but a headache. After the third session however I am feeling very strange, I feel almost out of it for lack of a better description. I cant seem to get myself to focus at work no matter what I do and had a panick attack which I don't usually suffer from. I am spaced and feel removed. I am also a bit nauseous. Is this normal and has anyone else described this. When will it pass? I need to work and I am getting anxious. Is it a good sign.

A: It's always very difficult for us to comment when we do not have a full case history in front of us, and better still, an actual patient. We are always aware that if we take issue with what someone has done without knowing the full picture we might make an unfair criticism for which we might be held to account.

What we do wonder, though, is whether it is entirely wise to do as much treatment in a week to someone with a background of MS/CFS who has reacted very strongly to the initial session. In people whose immune systems have been weakened by long term illness it is always wisest to start slowly with the strength of treatment and to row back if they throw quite severe reactions. This is not a universal rule, but it is impossible to tell after a single session whether the effects are a clearing of imbalances or an adverse reaction to treatment.

We suppose that since the second treatment didn't really cause anything over-dramatic the practitioner decided that it was the former, a mild-ish reaction which could indicate the beginning of the process of healing, and treated again. In the event, the further reactions after the third session might call for a review of that judgement.

It is highly likely that if you have been slightly overtreated the effects will not last that long. Acupuncture is a remarkably safe therapy, and the only serious incidents involve the penetration of organs with needles, and these occasions are very rare. If someone has a strong reaction to treatment then it normally lasts no more than 48 hours at most, and usually less. We suspect that by the time you receive this you will already be feeling a great deal more 'normal'.

It may, of course, be that the problems are not at all connected to the treatment; CFS issues can often come up at any time. However, it does look like the treatment is implicated, so it is really important that you discuss this with your practitioner in determining how to proceed. This might mean less frequent or less powerful treatment, and we are sure that a properly trained and qualified practitioner will listen to your concerns and respond accordingly.

We did say, though, that without looking at you and the case history we could not say for sure whether the practitioner was in any way at fault, and it may well be that he or she is surprised by this outcome and well able to respond positively to the feedback you are providing. Treatment is sometimes like a voyage of discovery where a practitioner can only find out what the best strategy is by setting off as normal and then reacting if the signs are that the treatment is too much for the patient. The practitioner may well have made a judgement that you needed frequent treatment based on your case notes, but your reactions might suggest that this is not the best way forward.

Page 1 of 27

Post a question

If you have any questions about acupuncture, browse our archive or ask an expert.

Ask an expert

BAcC Factsheets

Research based factsheets have been prepared for over 60 conditions especially for this website

Browse the facts