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Your question raises a number of important considerations about the use of acupuncture. We assume that you are referring to this 2012 study

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3312232/

which concludes that the use of Neiguan (PC-6) has a very positive effect in reducing AF episodes.

We addressed some of these issues in a reply at around the time when the study was first published:

There are some early indications that acupuncture may have an anti-arrhythmic effect in patients with atrial fibrillation. A study published earlier this year

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3312232/

concluded that there appeared to be benefits and that further large scale trials would be valuable to test the hypothesis more carefully.

However, it is only fair to say that needling a single point such as Neiguan repeatedly is not a fair representation of what a traditional acupuncturist does in practice. Although there is considerable overlap between eastern and western systems the arrhythmia typical of AF could be classified in several different ways within Chinese medicine, and the practitioner would be guided by evidence other than simply a reading of the rate of the pulse. That in turn would mean that ten people with AF might receive ten different treatments. To that extent, it is not that straightforward to extrapolate from research studies like this and conclude that 'acupuncture works'. 

The skill of the practitioner lies in making sense of the symptom of AF within an entirely different theoretical framework, and understanding each presentation in each individual patient as unique. The best advice we can give any prospective patient is to contact a BAcC member local to them to seek a short face to face consultation at which they can be given a better assessment of whether acupuncture might benefit them.

From the traditional acupuncture perspective using a single point in this way based on a single research study is quite a distance from the traditional paradigm in which the point sits. We are aware that there is a movement even within Chinese medicine to start to use this sort of formula treatment, and a very widely read paper published nearly twenty years ago, 'Pearls and String in Classical Acupuncture' has influenced a number of practitioners in the West, and is becoming slightly more common practice in China itself under the title 'best of both' - western differentiation and acupoint treatment.

Our view is that this is rather like Orwell's 'two legs good, four legs better' insofar as formula treatment may well work well for many people but probably won't work as well as a treatment which is designed for the specific imbalances of each patient. Since all patients are unique and different it would be seen as poor practice from a traditional perspective to use the same points over and over again. One of our old teachers used to refer to the use of the point as 'asking the system a question' and paying heed to the answer in following up.  'You wouldn't ask someone the same question ten times, would you?, he argued. While this may be a little extreme the general sense that acupuncture treatment is dynamic and evolutionary is critical to its nature.

We are sure that if you do want to pursue a specific approach like using the same point over and over again there are many practitioners of western medical acupuncture who would be happy to oblige. A full list can be found at the website of the British Medical Acupuncture Society, with whom, it has to be said, we have very cordial dealings. However, it seems to us that if you haven't had an episode for three months on the back of four or five traditional acupuncture sessions it might well be worth carrying on with the existing treatment plan and only considering the more formulaic approach if the traditional approach ceases to work as well.

It is a rather interesting footnote to this discussion that in Chinese medicine the specialist was usually looked down on as an inferior practitioner because of the narrow range of what they could treat whereas the generalist was held in great esteem precisely because they could treat anyone in whatever was the most appropriate manner.

There are a great many studies of this kind across the entire range of named conditions, and the main reason why they generate conclusions like this is because the 'gold standard' of research in the West, the randomised double blind control trial, demands that there are as few variables as possible. This means that trials and studies regularly have to use a single point or point combination to meet the research criteria. We have argued for years that this is an inappropriate way to test a dynamic system, but in Western medicine 'evidence based' is the new hallmark of acceptability. This is a cause of much concern for the very many conventional modalities which don't fit easily into trials intended for testing pharmaceuticals where neither patient nor practitioner knows what is being offered/prescribed as a guarantee of eliminating unconscious bias. 

We have been asked this question a number of times, and our answer has always been:

Google is a massively powerful search facility, and if you google 'acupuncture anosmia' it looks as though there are a number of studies which give cause for hope. If you look carefully, however, you will see that there is but one studyhttp://aim.bmj.com/content/21/4/153.longwhich is frequently quoted, generating a number of secondary references. This study, what we call an n=1 case study because it is the report of a single case, is important because it suggests that there may be something worth looking at in the use of acupuncture treatment. The weakness of n=1 studies, of course, is that they are not designed to test acupuncture, and the positive outcome could have arisen for any number of reasons, especially since the case study can provide no evidence for the sudden onset of the problem.That is not to say that acupuncture treatment is not worth trying. The use of Traditional Chinese medicine involves a great deal of questioning and examination to determine the state and flow of the energies of the body, called 'qi', and the state of the organs which are responsible for all of the functional aspects of the body. Even where there is no obvious cause from a conventional medical point of view, it is rare for a symptom to stand alone in Chinese medicine other than where it derives from a blockage. In this case, if the blockage is removed, the function is restored. We strongly suspect that this is what happened in the case study, and blockages of this kind can sometimes occur for no obvious reason.Generally speaking, though, a pattern of disharmony will generate a number of symptoms or changes in function, not all of which are clinically significant from a conventional perspective, and these may point t specific imbalances affecting Organic function. Note that we capitalise the word 'Organ' - what we understand by this in Chinese medicine is a great deal more than a physical unit in the body. The Chinese understanding of an Organ embraced functions on all levels, body mind and spirit, and when practised properly Chinese medicine can legitimately claim to be holistic.The best advice we can give is that you visit a BAcC member local to you for advice on whether they think that acupuncture treatment may be of benefit, and to discuss briefly with you the other aspects of your health which may indicate wider patterns which in turn may link to your problem. That is not to say that there may not be as simple a treatment as the one described in the paper, and one of the points used has the Chinese name 'Welcome Fragrance' suggesting that it may have a direct bearing on the sense of smell. You would certainly not do any harm. However, we would be more likely to look at this as a functional disturbance and be looking at other factors in the system which might point to a treatable pattern.We have had a look through all of the databases again and found references to these four papers which give mixed outcomes for treatment
  1. Vent J, Wang DW, Damm M. Effects of traditional Chinese acupuncture in post-viral olfactory dysfunction. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010;142:505–509. doi: 10.1016/j.otohns.2010.01.012.[PubMed] [Cross Ref]
  2. Silas J, Doty RL. No evidence for specific benefit of acupuncture over vitamin B complex in treating persons with olfactory dysfunction. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010;143:603. [PubMed]
  3. Damm M, Vent J. Response to: no evidence for specific benefit of acupuncture over vitamin B complex in treating persons with olfactory dysfunction, by Jonathan Silas and Richard L. Doty. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010;143:603–604. [PubMed]
  4. Anzinger A, Albrecht J, Kopietz R, Kleemann AM, Schöpf V, Demmel M, Schreder T, Eichhorn I, Wiesmann M. Effects of laserneedle acupuncture on olfactory sensitivity of healthy human subjects: a placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized trial. Rhinology. 2009;47:153–159. [PubMed]
and don't really give us much cause to be over-optimistic. However, what we said above about blockages and energetic weaknesses is probably a great deal more relevant than studies which are either too small to underpin any conclusions or too specific to one variant of anosmia. Chinese medicine was always and remains the treatment of the person, not the named condition, in the expectation that if the system is in good balance it will repair itself and function as it should. This seems to us a better statement of what we are trying to achieve than 'acupuncture treats x and y', and having used this kind of approach for many, many years we have seen enough problems resolve for which there was no evidence to suggest that a short course of treatment is always worth trying, and will certainly cause no harm.
We have been asked many times about tinnitus, and our most recent reply has been:

We tend to be very conservative in the advice we give about tinnitus. One recent response said:We used to be a great deal more downbeat about the treatment of tinnitus than we are now because our experience in practice was that it could prove intractable to treatment. However, as our factsheet showshttp://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/tinnitus.htmland as some recent personal experience in clinic has shown too, there may be some hope.The problem with measuring the success of treatment for tinnitus is that its appearance and disappearance can be entirely random. If you read the tinnitus association's magazine you will see stories along the lines of 'I tried everything and then x worked' and an equal number of stories which say 'I had tinnitus for five years and then one day it just went.'  Research trials tend to be quite reliable - it would be a remarkable coincidence if half the trial participants experienced a spontaneous improvement - but one-off cases could be a coincidence, with acupuncture just happening to be the therapy of choice when the change happened.The available evidence, however, suggests that it might be worth a try with the proviso that progress is reviewed at regular intervals, and some kind of objective measure can be found, i.e. how much it interferes with a radio set at a particular level. It might also repay investigation of what makes it worse and what makes it better. A long n-1 case study this expert conducted had very little impact on the condition but did increase the sufferer's ability to deal with it.The best advice is to visit a BAcC member local to you  for an informal face to face assessment of what may be possible. There are one or two clearly recognisable syndromes within Chinese medicine which might offer considerable confidence that muting the problem may be possible, but even a general balancing of the system may bear fruit.
Invariably we check for more evidence when we are asked a question to which we have responded before, and the evidence trail for the fact sheet stops some time ago. We found a number of small studies like this onehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26747258which seem on the face of it to encourage the belief that there is a recognised connection between acupuncture treatment and symptom relief. There is also a systematic review, a 'trial of all trials' beloved of researchers because it aggregates to a much more powerful study than the individual ones.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3493359/This draws the usual sorts of conclusion about the need for more and better trials, but the authors do conclude that acupuncture is worth trying as a safe alternative which seemed to have shown some success in addressing the problem.The advice we gave before, though, holds good. Each case is unique and different, as is each treatment plan, and the best advice you can get will always come from someone who can see your problem in its overall context.So, in answer to your question, there is some evidence that acupuncture treatment may help tinnitus, but not yet enough for us to say with any certainty that a result is guaranteed.As far as specialists are concerned, by its very nature Chinese medicine is generalist. Indeed in ancient China specialists were regarded as decidedly inferior because they only treated single conditions. From the Chinese medicine perspective it is the patient who has the problem, not the problem which is the primary focus. Each manifestation of a problem is unique and different, and twenty people with the same named problem might be treated in twenty different ways.On this basis we are happy to recommend any of our members to offer the same exemplary level of care, and using the postcode search on our home page www.acupuncture.org.uk will direct you to the geographically closest.
Our factsheet on nausea and vomiting

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/nausea-and-vomiting.html
talks a great deal about the evidence for acupuncture treatment helping with this distressing side effect of chemotherapy. This quotes a study by Ezzo which is now over a decade old but which points clearly to a level of efficacy. It is in the form of a systematic review, a consolidated account of all available trials of suitable quality, and very much loved by research statisticians for giving a far clearer idea than single trials of whether something really works.We always undertake a review of literature and studies which may have been published more recently and have found several overviews for the use of acupuncture treatment with cancer treatment as a whole. One rather useful one ishttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3577953/which looks at all aspects of the management of cancer and its treatment. It's a little technical, as many of these studies are, but not beyond most people to be able to find some useful material. This studyhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24815460also provides useful background.The key thing we have to be clear about with all cancer patients is the limit within which we work. As you have no doubt read we always claim to treat people, not diseases, but if we are not careful this is extended to 'treating people with diseases' and then truncated to 'treating diseases'. When someone has cancer this is a message they would like to hear, but there is no evidence that acupuncture treatment can treat cancer per se. Where it can be really effective is in reducing the side effects of the conventional treatments for cancer which are often debilitating and distressing. We also believe that treating the person, not simply the problem which they have, also mobilises the body's own healing responses to address many aspects of the strain under which conventional treatment places the body and the mind.The best advice we can give is that you visit a local BAcC to discuss with them what may be possible for you. Most are willing to give up a little time to prospective patients without charge to see at first hand what they might be able to offer. This also gives you a chance to meet them and see where they work before committing to treatment.
We are sorry to hear of your father's problem. We are aware from clinical experience just how much suffering this can cause because of its relentless nature.

There isn't a great deal of published evidence for the treatment of itching as such, although what there is is quite positive, as this systematic review shows: 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4430643/

Most of the research which would prove relevant is buried away in studies of diabetes and kidney problems where the itching is a part of a wider clinical picture.We suspect that there is no easy fix for this problem. There is a very strong chance that the changes in blood chemistry caused by the diabetes and kidney disease are the drivers for the itching, and these are not likely to relent as his age increases. What acupuncture may be able to do, though, is to break the cycle of discontent which can mean that the anxiety and distress caused by the problem become one of the factors which ensures that it escalates. Many conventional medicines are prescribed in this way to stop thins building on themselves, and there are certainly points used in Chinese medicine which would accomplish relief both from itching and anxiety at the same time. The only major question is now much relief and how sustainable it is.However, Chinese medicine looks at the whole person, not simply at the condition which someone has, and there would be a great deal of questioning about where the itching was, what made it better or worse, and so on, and looking at this within the context of the overall functioning of the body. There is a tendency sometimes to ascribe any symptoms to the headline conditions which people have, and this may not be the case. There may be all sorts of treatable reasons why someone develops itching, and a skilled practitioner might find something eminently treatable.The best advice as always is to try to get your father to visit a local BAcC member for an informal chat. Most are more than happy to give up a little time without charge to prospective patients, and this will allow someone to give your father a much better idea of what may be possible.  
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