Ask an expert - body - skin conditions - eczema

5 questions

 Interestingly enough, the issue of treating children is very much a live one in the BAcC at the moment. Our members have always treated children, but over the years there has been an increasing recognition that children are not the same as little adults. Specialist courses have developed, and the BAcC has now recognised that there are expert levels of practice which might entitle a member to advertise themselves as an expert in treating children. The guidelines which will underpin this are not quite ready for publication, and so at this point we cannot give out the names of members who might meet these standards.

 However, if you use google with your location, 'acupuncture' and 'children' we are fairly confident that you will quickly identify someone local to you who has undertaken specialist postgraduate training. That is not to say that the ordinary BAcC member cannot treat children, only that someone who makes the treatment of children a focus in their practice is likely to have greater experience about dealing with children and recognising the patterns of disease unique to children.

Using google will also very rapidly identify the two or three major course providers for paediatric acupuncture, and some of these provide drop down lists of practitioner by area.

It is also commonly held view in the profession that skin problems are particularly benefited by herbal medicine, and finding someone with this additional string to their bow might be an advantage. Our members are often very helpful at directing prospective patients to members within their area whom they know personally and trust as experts in their field, and if all else fails you could almost certainly get a good steer from a practitioner local to you.

This remains the best advice that we can offer. We have checked the research databases to see if anything further has been published than the studies reported in our factsheet

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/eczema-and-psoriasis.html

but the evidence is a little thin. However, it would be fair to say that the trials which have taken place are not always accurate reflections of how we treat people, so the fact that results are not that impressive doesn't surprise us.

We often find that there are complex reasons for someone having eczema, but the crucial thing is finding something which breaks the cycle leading to a flare-up. If this can be done then it can stop the feeling that once it appears a little it will become a full-blown attack, as the worry of a possible recurrence can sometimes do.

We hope that you manage to track down a suitably qualified practitioner. In our experience children are great responders; if treatment is going to work it usually does so quickly.

 

A:  As you can imagine, we have been asked similar questions on several occasions, and a typical answer is:

Can acupuncture help eczema?

A:  The use of acupuncture for skin conditions is not particularly well researched, as our fact sheet shows:

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/eczema-and-psoriasis.html

There may be a number of reasons for this, one of which is that skin conditions form a 'fuzzy' set where the definition and location are not always precise enough to be testing like with like, a pre-condition of the randomised double blind control trial much loved by western science.

That said, there is a considerable amount of anecdotal evidence within the profession about good reactions to treatment, especially a reduction in the amount of itching and discomfort. One has to be cautious, however; a very common effect of initial treatment is a radical improvement followed by a settling back to nearly the same state as before. We have seen a number of people become even more disheartened when this has happened, even though we have said that short-term results are unlikely and if they appear usually unsustainable.

It has to be said, though, that the collective view inside the BAcC is that skin problems are usually best treated with a combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture. There is something about the precision with which the formulae are designed and the daily routine of treatment which clearly seems to evince powerful changes in the system. Most members of the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine are also BAcC acupuncturists, and finding someone in your area who practises both may be a very good way forward. 

Our best advice to you is to see if there are BAcC members local to you who also use Chinese Herbal medicine, and to see if they can offer you a brief face to face assessment of whether they believe tahat acupuncture and herbal treatment can help you.

We think that this remains the best advice that we can give. The only caveat which we sometimes add is that acupuncture is often used as a last resort, and before someone comes to us they have taken a large number of medications which can had added layer upon layer of secondary effects on the initial problem. The overall clinical picture can sometimes be a little more complex than one would hope to see. However, acupuncture treatment treats the person, not the condition, and the treatment is tailored to the needs of the individual to help their system restore its own balance and healing ability. The oldest forms of Chinese medicine were often asymptomatic, driven by the simple belief that a system in balance corrected symptoms. In clinical practice, an experienced practitioner can both treat the underlying cause and the symptoms at the same time to facilitate recovery.

Q:  Can my 15 year old son receive acupuncture? He has severe eczema.  This is a last resort we have tried everything.

A:  The use of acupuncture for skin conditions is not particularly well researched, as our fact sheet shows:

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/eczema-and-psoriasis.html

There may be a number of reasons for this, one of which is that skin conditions form a 'fuzzy' set where the definition and location are not always precise enough to be testing like with like, a pre-condition of the randomised double blind control trial much loved by western science.

That said, there is a considerable amount of anecdotal evidence within the profession about good reactions to treatment, especialy a reduction in the amount of itching and discomfort. One has to be cautious, however; a very common effect of initial treatment is a radical improvement followed by a settling back to nearly the same state as before. We have seen a number of people become even more disheartened when this has happened, even though we have said that short-term results are unlikely and if they appear usually unsustainable.

It has to be said, though, that the collective view inside the BAcC is that skin problems are usually best treated with a combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture. There is something about the precision with which the formulae are designed and the daily routine of treatment which clearly seems to evince powerful changes in the system. Most members of the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine are also BAcC acupuncturists, and finding someone in your area who practises both may be a very good way forward. The fact that your son is 15 may also be in his favour; although he takes up as much space as an adult, he is still a child and children can often respond much more quickly to treatment.

Our best advice to you is to see if there are BAcC members local to you who also use Chinese Herbal medicine, and to see if they can offer you a brief face to face assessment of whether they believe tahat acupuncture and herbal treatment can help your son.

Q:  My son is three years old and suffers severely with eczema.  Do you treat children?  I will try anything to help take this horrible condition away.  He has suffered since three month old and it is so distressing .

A: Interestingly enough, the issue of treating children is very much a live one in the BAcC at the moment. Our members have always treated children, but over the years there has been an increasing recognition that children are not the same as little adults. Specialist courses have developed, and the BAcC has now recognised that there are expert levels of practice which might entitle a member to advertise themselves as an expert in treating children. The guidelines which will underpin this are not quite ready for publication, and so at this point we cannot give out the names of members who might meet these standards.

 

 

 However, if you use google with your location, 'acupuncture' and 'children' we are fairly confident that you will quickly identify someone local to you who has undertaken specialist postgraduate training. That is not to say that the ordinary BAcC member cannot treat children, only that someone who makes the treatment of children a focus in their practice is likely to have greater experience about dealing with children and recognising the patterns of disease unique to children.

 

 

Using google will also very rapidly identify the two or three major course providers for paediatric acupuncture, and some of these provide drop down lists of practitioner by area.

 

 

It is also commonly held view in the profession that skin problems are particularly benefited by herbal medicine, and finding someone with this additional string to their bow might be an advantage. Our members are often very helpful at directing prospective patients to members within their area whom they know personally and trust as experts in their field, and if all else fails you could almost certainly get a good steer from a practitioner local to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As our fact sheet says please click here
 
there hasn't been a great deal of research in the use of acupuncture for the treatment of psoriasis, and where small studies have been done there has not been a great deal of success on which one could base a positive recommendation.
 
This is not to say that acupuncture treatment may not be of benefit. Skins problems such as eczema and psoriasis can have a variety of causes, some of them mental and emotional as well as environmental and the universal 'idiopathic', which is western medical speak for 'it just happens', or 'we don't know what causes it'. Traditional Chinese medicine was initially premise on the simple but profound belief that symptoms were merely alarm bells that the system as a whole was out of balance, and that a skilled physician would be able to assess what was needed to restore balance and by doing so eradicate the symptoms. There is no doubt that each year many people have acupuncture on this more general basis and experience some very encouraging results.
 
However, we have to say that the received wisdom in the acupuncture profession is that Chinese herbal medicine often generates better results for skin conditions, possibly because the regular daily or twice daily treatment is better suited to dealing with the problem or possibly because the precise adjustments of the prescription achieve what broader techniques may not. In any event, it may well be worth your while contacting a member of the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine (RCHM) for advice. You will probably find that the person you speak to i also a BAcC member, since more than 90% of the RCHM membership is dual-registered.
 
This does not mean that we would entirely rule out acupuncture as your first option, and you may still find it valuable to discuss your own unique presentation with a BAcC member local to you. He or she will be able to give you a better face to face assessment depending on the spread and location of the condition than we could do here.

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