Ask an expert - general - bruising

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Q:  This question is not strictly related to acupuncture, but i couldn't find answers anywhere else so I'm hoping an expert here could help me. Last week I accidentally punctured the palm of my hand with a large thumb tack by putting my weight on the desk when standing,  not realising the was an upturned pin under where I put my hand. It was a shock to say the least but the pain subsided quickly after I pulled the pin out. There was very little blood but my ring finger did twitch and my forearm felt tingly. Now a week on I am still feeling uncomfortable sensations in my ring finger, like a tightness and slight pain. The pin went in about two inches below the base of my ring finger. I should mention also that about a year ago I accidentally sliced open my hand about 1 inch below my ring finger and pinky. At the time I had it glued with butterfly stitches. There was no remaining pain once the slight swelling etc had gone down.

A: We're sorry to hear what has happened to you.

As you say, it isn't an acupuncture-related injury, but if we did have a patient report of similar response to an acupuncture needle, we would probably say that the reason for the continuing pain is most likely to be from deep bruising which has caused a clot to form and which is pressing on the nerve, replicating the pains you felt when the accident first happened. If this is the case, then it will clear within a fortnight or so with a gradual reduction in the unpleasant sensations.

It is possible that there has been some damage to the nerve itself, or any one of several nerves which traverse the area, and the outcome here may be a little more difficult to predict. We have certainly come across one case where a direct hit on a nerve generated unpleasant sensations for a number of months. However, this would be very rare, and if the symptoms continue with the same level of intensity thrughout the next fortnight, or even become a bit worse, then you will need to see your GP to get a referral to a neurologist. There may be no harm in seeing your GP early anyway; waiting list medicine sometimes demands that people try to get themselves on the treadmill sooner rather than later. If your GP has on inspection any reason to suspect nerve damage, then an early referral is a good idea.

On the balance of probabilities, though, the symptoms should begin to subside during this week.

As an aside, there are a number of powerful acupuncture points on the palm of the hand, and you may have given yourself an unwitting treatment. Two of the major channels travel where you report symptoms, but the chances that they would resonate for this long are very small. Not the nicest way to have acupuncture treatment either!

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