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Back pain after first session of acupuncture - is this normal?

Q:  I had acupuncture for the first time  and felt very energised after it. By the afternoon I was experiencing lower back pain - which I normally do not have. 2 days later and the lower back pain is still there. Could this have anything to do with toxins being released in the session and if so can I expect relief from the pain anytime soon?

A:  We have to say that we have not encountered any instances where someone has reported lower back pain as a direct consequence of acupuncture treatment, and we have searched the databases to check.

 That is not to say that it didn't come out of the session itself. Our colleagues in the physiotherapy profession who also use acupuncture do say that there are occasions when a rigid back is actually guarding and holding in place a problematic disk, so releasing the muscles by relaxing everything can actually cause problems to appear. However, in this instance there is almost always some case history of back problems before which would support this as a causal pattern.

 You don't mention whether or not you have had back pains before, but there are also occasions when a symptom which has cleared earlier in life can reappear for one last time. This is more common with problems like migraine, where someone can end up with a one-off 'special' but we have heard of the same happening with back pains. This will almost definitely be a transient reaction if this is the case. The same would apply if there were a general release of toxins, but in that case we would expect a slightly more extensive range of odd symptoms.

 

Of course, there can sometimes we simple mechanical reasons. We have heard of people who found that the couch on which they were treated was lumpy or unbalanced, and the back pain literally arose from the treatment because of this.

 Finally we have to say that the appearance of the back pain may be coincidental. This does sound horribly like 'it wasn't me' but with over 4 million treatments a year there are bound to be some cases where the problem appears after but not because of the treatment.

 In nearly all cases, though, the pain will be transient and probably have gone by the time you read this. If if hasn't then it is worth talking through in detail with your practitioner what they did and how this might have been implicated in what happened. If it does carry on, though, it may well also be worth talking to your GP in case it is a sign of an underlying problem which needs to be followed up, or worth seeing an osteopath trained to make precise judgements about someone's physical structure. There are a number of internal problems which can manifest as back pain, and your GP is the best placed person to see if there is anything going on. 


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