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Can acupuncture help cyclical vomiting syndrome

Q:  My daughter (aged 20) has been diagnosed with cyclical vomiting syndrome. She has had 8 episodes in 2 years and has been admitted to hospital 3 times for stays of over 1 week each time to try to stop  the vomiting and rehydrate her. The doctors cannot find any cause for this and we are just experimenting with different medications when an episode begins. I had acupuncture during my pregnancy for severe morning sickness and wondered if it might help my daughter. Can you offer any advice? 

A:  As a rather broad generalisation the use of acupuncture for stopping nausea and vomiting is well documented and researched. Our newly updated fact sheet

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/nausea-and-vomiting.html

provides a wealth of evidence of the various manifestations of nausea and vomiting and its treatment. As you can see from the detail the research evidence on the treatment of morning sickness is not as positive as the post operative nausea treatment, but our clinical experience is that more often than not we can reduce the severity of the episodes even if they persist. The only caution, as your daughter knows all too well, is that someone can become severely dehydrated very quickly, and we always advise colleagues not to let the patient's current conventional treatment schedules lapse while they follow someone's urge to find an alternative solution.

Of course, the major concern that we have is that the research protocols often run completely counter to the way we actually work in treating people rather than named conditions. The formula treatment often applied, while it may work well with a number of patients, will be nowhere near as good as treatment which sets this symptom in its overall context. This can often generate better results, but can also reveal underlying issues which might make a rapid fix of the problem unlikely. An honest practitioner will let you know this rather than let you pin your faith on studies which may not apply, and we trust out colleagues to work in this way.

The best advice, advice which we tend to give routinely, is for your daughter to visit a BAcC member local to her for a brief chat and informal face to face assessment of what may be possible. Most members are happy to give up some time without charge for a prospective patient to discuss what is happening, and this also gives the patient a chance to meet the practitioner and see where they work. In my personal experience, this is a very sensible and reassuring way to work, and patients appreciate the fact that they are not being railroaded into treatment about which they are uncertain.

I hope that acupuncture treatment is able to help your daughter with what I know to be a very debilitating problem.