I suffer from ventricular ectopics

Q: Hi. I suffer from ventricular ectopics,I have seen Drs regularly and take beta blockers which work to a degree. I have periods when things aren't too bad and periods when things are really bad,I do get quite down during these times. Do you think acupuncture would help?

A: We have been asked similar questions before, and in reply to one we said:

One has to be very careful answering questions such as these. Taking the pulse a the wrist is one of the key diagnostic techniques in Chinese medicine, along with looking at the tongue and a number of other evaluations. The irregular pulse has clinical significance in the tradition, and point to specific disorders of organic function as understood within this paradigm of medicine. However, these may not all involve the heart - in fact, most of them don't - and any suggestion that this is treating the heart as it is understood in the west needs to be set aside.

From a conventional medicine point of view, there is not a great deal of evidence that acupuncture can treat these problems, although what little there is does tend to be very positive, although not always methodologically sound enough to use as the basis for a recommendation. A good example of a systematic review is:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18992625

Some of the published research also involves animal experiments, sometimes called 'ratpuncture' in the trade, and although the results here may be promising it is quite a large assumption to believe that human physiology will respond in the same way.

We think that it would certainly be worthwhile talking to a BAcC member local to you about what the conditions may be telling them about the way your system as a whole is functioning. From our perspective all of our members are equally well-qualified to deal with the vast majority of patients who present at their clinics, and it is obvious from what we have said earlier that there are no specialists in heart problems per se - Chinese medicine primarily treats the person, not the condition which someone has.


There have been a couple of other systematic reviews

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28432528

http://www.internationaljournalofcardiology.com/article/S0167-5273(11)00227-0/fulltext

which make largely positive noises, but as in all of these kinds of studies the treatment which is given is largely formulaic, and does not really represent what a traditional acupuncturist does, which is to gear treatment to the individual and his/her unique balance of energies. Where trials offer designs which allow the practitioner to do what they might normally do, so called 'black box' trials, the results tend to get better and better.

The bottom line, though, is that from a Chinese medicine perspective there are often functional disturbances which can generate symptoms, often far away from the source of the manifesting problem. The skill and art of the practitioner is to make sense of the diagnostic information and treat the root of the problem. This can often cause a symptom to reduce or even disappear without there having been any apparent connection between where the needles were placed and the part of the body in distress.

The advice we gave before still holds good, to visit a local BAcC member for advice and a short face to face assessment of what may be happening. Most BAcC members are only too happy to give a small amount of time without charge to prospective patients to enable them to assess whether acupuncture is the best treatment for their problem. This will obviously give a far better idea of what may be possible than what we can say at a distance.

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