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I am female aged 68 years. I only take 1 each of Lanzaprozale & Trospium daily. I have suffered UTI's for a number of years and taken antibiotics in varioning amounts..After many visits and every 2 years for a cystoscopy I have been told that it is a

There is no doubt that the treatment which you have already been prescribed, oestrogen in pessary form, has been consistently shown to help prevent recurrent UTIs in post-menopausal women. As such, we would be unlikely to recommend acupuncture treatment as an immediate alternative, but there may be some scope in discussing with your GP what happens if the oestrogen brings the UTIs under control. Using acupuncture alongside the other treatment may improve the overall results and may facilitate a safe withdrawal from long term medication use.

Whenever we receive an enquiry we look through all the research databases to see what, if any, research exists. Most acupuncture research is undertaken in China and not translated, so restricted funding and the problems of assembling suitable cohorts of patients can mean not a great deal exists. However, there are two studies from Bergen in Norway


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9612877

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1447293/


which showed some very promising results. Both of these are cited on reviews of the treatment of recurrent UTIs, and the following two

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4931387/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3749018/

are worth a look because they spell out all of the options and are generally very positive about the treatment which you have been recommended to have.

There are obviously ways of treating UTIs from a Chinese medicine perspective; they are not a recent invention! The theoretical basis of Chinese medicine is entirely different, and the manner in which the condition presents will point to specific patterns of imbalance which may be reflected in other systemic problems. It is not often that a symptom stands in isolation, and our basic premise of treating the person, not simply the condition, tries to make sense of a symptom within its overall context. This can sometimes mean treating the overall patterns without specific reference to the individual problems, which can be quite confusing to a patient. However, if it works...!

Our one concern in cases like this is that people often get caught up with treatment regimes which it is quite difficult to unravel. The Trospium and Lansoprazole may not be entirely necessary if the oestrogen takes effect, but a practitioner would not be able to make that call, only the GP who prescribed them. This can make the clinical picture a little more confusing, but a properly trained practitioner will be able to assess the impact of medications on the system and allow for them.

Trospium is often prescribed for an over-active bladder, and if that is one of the manifestations of the UTIs you have been experiencing, there is some good evidence that acupuncture may have be of benefit. These three studies 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15994629

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25399241

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25033919

all make interesting reading.

However, the best advice that we can give is that you drop in to see a local BAcC member to discuss what may be best for you. Complex presentations are always best advised on face to face, and most of our members are very happy to give up some time without charge to prospective patients to ensure that acupuncture is the best option for their problems. This also gives you a good chance to meet them and see where they work before committing to treatment.

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