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Monday, 24 July 2017 10:44

Hi- I recently had a session of acupuncture related to some bladder issues I have been having. The Acupuncturist mentioned that the tibular nerve on my left leg would help with these issues if stimulated with electro-acupunture and proceed with treat

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We are sorry to hear that you are experiencing what sound like very unpleasant side-effects from a treatment.

We are not sure from your email what the provenance of your practitioner is. The technique you describe is called percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation, about which you can read here:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ipg362/chapter/1-Guidance

It is not really an acupuncture technique as such, at least it certainly is not a part of the ancient traditional Chinese medicine which we all practise. It is a modern technique using needles as electrodes which, as is often the case in modern developments of acupuncture, is described as working 'by a mechanism which is not yet properly understood.' It may well be that a traditional acupuncturist has decided to add this to their repertoire, but it is not a part of our core training.

As far as your strange symptoms are concerned, in conventional medicine it might be possible to make a case for some of the local ones, i.e. pain or tingling in the immediate area of the electrodes, because there may have actually been irritation of the nerves or small bruises which have consolidated to generate the symptoms from which you suffer. However, there would be very little that western medicine could do to explain why that should be generating sensations in your left arm and in your head.

From a traditional acupuncture perspective it might just be possible that the stimulation has had an effect on the channels of energy, and there are certainly internal connections between hand, foot and head which might explain what is going on. However, the mystery here would be what was causing the connection to be made several days after the treatment. If there are after effects or adverse effects after treatment they are generally immediate and subside within the first 48 hours. It is rather unusual for something to kick in three or fours days after the event and then to generate something which we call propagated needle sensation at this stage. This kind of effect takes a great deal of work to generate, and it is difficult to see what could be replicating this so long after a session.

Of course, we do have to bear in mind that there are sometimes occasions when a new symptom arises after, but not because of, a treatment. With four million treatments a year this can always be a possibility. The first thing we always advise, and what applies especially in your case, is to seek medical advice to find out exactly what is happening. This may take a referral to a neurologist, but since it sounds like a neurological effect getting advice here may well establish causation, i.e. whether the treatment actually caused what it happening. In an event this will point the way towards making it go away.

It might also be worthwhile talking to the practitioner about what they have done. They will know better than anyone else what points and techniques they have used, and may be able to make sense of what has happened to you.

It may be comforting to be aware that very few serious adverse events take place each year, and where these do happen from acupuncture treatment it is usually from penetration of an organ or direct physical damage. The remainder tend to be short-lived and transient, and we are confident that if this is really an effect of treatment it will subside relatively quickly. 



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