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I have been told I have peripheral neuropathy, the symptoms are dizziness, vertigo and the feeling that 'I am walking on a mattress' would acupuncture be of any help?

If we took your question as face value as one about peripheral neuropathy then we might be tempted to use an answer we gave quite recently:

There is some evidence that acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of neuropathy, as our factsheet http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/neuropathic-pain.html
shows but this is not yet compelling enough for us make a firm recommendation. If you google for results from the US National Centre for Biotechnology Information, a very useful research resource, as 'ncbi acupuncture peripheral neuropathy' you will find references to a number of studies, some of which seem to show very positive results, others less so. Treating nerve damage with acupuncture, however, suffers from the same limitations as any other therapy. If the damage is already considerable there is less chance of reducing the pain and loss of sensation.

Chinese acupuncture is based on a theory of energy, called 'qi', and its flow and balance in the body. This can often mean that the needles used in conditions like peripheral neuropathy are often local to the problem and seen as a blockage in the flow of qi, but Chinese medicine has an elaborate understanding of the functional nature of the internal organs, understood entirely differently from in the West, and will often look at how the problem may also be a manifestation of a wider functional disturbance in the system. Then, of course, you have the underlying premise of the original Chinese medical systems which were largely asymptomatic, regarding the achievement of overall balance as the primary aim in the belief that this would deal with symptoms wherever they manifested.

The important element in treating peripheral neuropathy is understanding the physiological basis for its appearance in western terms and being realistic about what may be achieved. If this amounts to maintaining the status quo, or even as one very wise patient expressed it 'getting worse slower', then as long as this is the agreed basis for treatment, that is fine. Our members are trained to avoid raising unreal and unreasonable expectations in people with degenerative conditions or permanent physical damage. Talking to a BAcC member local to you face to face may be the best advice if you are considering treatment. They should be able to assess relatively quickly whether acupuncture was a worthwhile option for you.

This is quite a useful start because it sets out some basic principles and also emphasises that for conditions like diabetic neuropathy in the language of modern sales talk, 'once it's gone, it's gone.'

However, without any further elaboration of the health condition which may be the root cause of your symptoms we would be looking at them as they were in  themselves and trying to make sense of them within the framework of Chinese medicine. As our factsheet on vertigo shows

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/2599-vertigo.html

there is a growing body of evidence which suggests that acupuncture might be of benefit, but even here we would say that vertigo is simply a label for someone's experience, and that once it is put in the context of someone's overall balance it can be the result of any number of possible imbalances from a Chinese medicine perspective. That is why we invariably recommend that someone sees a BAcC member for an informal chat. Most are happy to give up a little time without charge to discuss based on a first hand view whether acupuncture treatment might the best option for you. We have confidence that if it isn't they will say so. There are alternatives if this seemed to be the case.

It does illustrate very well for us, though, how working backwards from symptoms to a disease label can make a huge difference to how one perceives a problem. The great strength of Chinese medicine is that it see symptoms in their wider context as manifestations of the disease, not necessarily the disease itself.