I have read that acupuncture can be used as a facial rejuvenation. What are your thoughts on this?

Q: There is absolutely no doubt that this has become a very popular and recent extension to traditional acupuncture practice; many BAcC members undertake postgraduate training in the techniques, some of which are not a part of mainstream acupuncture training, and openly advertise this as an extension of their work. 'Rejuvenation' is not an acceptable term any longer; you would need much more rigorous evidence to meet the current ASA standards for advertisers. Most people describe their work as 'cosmetic acupuncture' or simply 'facial acupuncture.'

A:  Popularity brings challenges, and this field has also become something of a lucrative sideline within the beauty business. This has meant the entry into the business of people who have trained only in this aspect of the work, and we have two major reservations about this. First is that no-one can be properly and effectively trained in the safe and hygienic practice of acupuncture in the course of a weekend training programme. From our perspective it matters not whether the practitioner uses ten needles a year or ten thousand needles a year, the standards remain the same. Our concern, as always, is that an amateur in what is a professional field does something wrong, and we can guarantee that the headline will say 'acupuncturist does.....'. No point in us quibbling about levels of training, the damage will have been done. When you think that this technique may be used by people in the public eye, the possibilities for a PR disaster are considerable.

More importantly, though, there is no separate field of 'facial acupuncture'. There are simply the techniques of traditional acupuncture applied to a specific area, and these techniques will only be effective to the extent that the practitioner takes into account the systemic problems against which the facial problems occur. The most irritating thing from our perspective is that acupuncture used without an understanding of the wider system will most often not work very well, and we believe that a porr experience, where acupuncture treatment seems not to work, will turn someone away from a system which properly applied could do a great deal not just for the face but for the rest of the person too.

Our advice is that if you are looking for someone to provide this form of treatment, be sure to go to someone who also uses traditional acupuncture as a main profession. That is your best chance, in our view, of optimising your investment in time and money. We would also advise you to shop around. In the view of this expert, this has become something of a 'cash cow' for some practitioners who price themselves according to the beauty market in which the treatment is offered. Whilst we would recognise the value of postgraduate training and experience, it is after only only traditional acupuncture applied in a specific area, and the gap between someone's ordinary charges and this form of treatment should not be too great.