My mom just had acupuncture yesterday at noon as the practitioner said that she had blood deficiency (her pulse on her left wrist was too weak). Now my mom is experiencing extreme dizziness, cold sweat, fatigue, and nauseousness. Is this normal and w

Q: My mom just had acupuncture yesterday at noon as the practitioner said that she had blood deficiency (her pulse on her left wrist was too weak). Now my mom is experiencing extreme dizziness, cold sweat, fatigue, and nauseousness. Is this normal and what should we do?

A: We are sorry to hear of your mother's post-treatment episodes. However, we are confident that by the time you receive this reply everything will have settled down.

It is very rare for people to suffer serious side effects or adverse events after treatment, and the ones that do happen are invariably to do with actual physical damage caused by a needle. In the hands of a properly trained and qualified professional acupuncturist this is extremely unlikely to happen; it is only the poorly trained or inept that cause these sorts of problems.

However, it can be the case that people can 'wobble' a bit after a first session, and some of the things you mention - dizziness,  fatigue, nausea and so on  - can happen. There are a number of possible explanations for this. Sometimes it is the body starting the process of cleansing itself of energetic blockages. The Chinese believed that pathogens travelled inwards and reversing this process could often lead to a disturbance as they cleared. Some people are also energetically very sensitive, especially if they are somewhat weakened. This can be a reaction to treatment which is too powerful for them, and the practitioner will take this into account when they get feedback, and adjust the strength of treatment accordingly. This might mean fewer needles, less manipulation and so on, but all of these adjustments can make a tremendous difference if someone is a strong reactor.

Of course, there are two other more prosaic reasons. The first is that your mother may not have been warned of some of the basic housekeeping rules before treatment, as for instance making sure that you have eaten something within the last few hours rather than being treated on an empty stomach, and this can sometimes exaggerate the effects of treatment. We have seen a patient faint because she hadn't eaten for twelve hours before treatment, and then only a small bowl of cereal. The second possibility is that the symptoms are of a virus, but by coincidence have happened after treatment. With over four million treatments being given every year there are bound to be a few occasions when someone gets ill at the same time as treatment, but without any causal connection. If this is the case, then the usual steps need to be taken; bed rest, etc etc.

We strongly suspect that these are transient reactions to treatment, though, and we think they may well have subsided before you get this response. It is important to let the practitioner know, and it may well be worthwhile calling the practitioner today for advice and guidance. They will know better than we could what they have done and what your mother may need to do to help. If the symptoms have persisted for 48 hours and show no signs of relenting then it may well be worth having a word with her GP, or calling the 111 advice line, the NHS non-urgent service. We have found this to be very successful at directing people to the best help for their needs.

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