I have tennis elbow in both arms the right arm is worse than the left.ive had 4 treatments now which lasts half an hour each time...

Q: I have tennis elbow in both arms the right arm is worse than the left.ive had 4 treatments now which lasts half an hour each time. After I have a 15 min massage the massage is so rough that the pain wants to make me cry. I was told I have bad circulation and that's why the massage is rough. So then I spend 4 days in pain after getting over the experience to go back 3 days later to have it all over again. The problem is the gentleman doesn't speak much English so I find it hard to ask him questions and get answers  I'm not seeing any progress at the moment  my question is is this normal for me to still have pain and should the massage be so vigorous?

A: We are sorry to hear of your experience.  It certainly does not help that the practitioner is not able to communicate very easily. However, we have to say that you need to be aware that you are in charge in the treatment room, and that the practitioner can only work with your consent. If you decide that the massage is too rough and ask him to stop it, then stop it he must or be guilty of common assault. It is then his problem/challenge to use his skills to circumvent the problem of not being able to get the qi moving by vigorous massage. There are always ways!

Should there be progress by now? That is a very difficult question to answer. It depends a great deal on the severity of the initial problem. Our factsheet has some reasonable evidence for the benefit of acupuncture treatment

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/tennis-elbow.html

but there are widely different degrees of the problem, and in some cases it can take half a dozen sessions to get the energy moving and undo the stagnation of the energy.

However, that said, the treatment should not be causing pain four days later, and unless there are stunningly good clinical results to back up continuation it would seem entirely legitimate to question whether the course of treatment is really going anywhere. There has to come a point after about four or five sessions where one can say with some certainty whether it looks like the treatment will succeed, and if it doesn't then it is important to draw a line in the sand and stop.

It is not our job to talk one of our possible members out of a job, but you need to discuss this situation with him, and if the answer doesn't help you then perhaps you might need to re-consider whether he is the best practitioner for you. We have always been very insistent that a practitioner must have sufficiently good English to address a patient's concerns because we are all too well aware of the consequences of people feeling that they haven't been heard.

And the bottom line is that it's a buyer's market. If you aren't happy with the treatment there are probably a great many other practitioners close by to whom you can transfer.

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