In April, my Trusted Acupuncturist of 29 years sadly passed away. I know that he will be a hard act to follow and am nervous about how I can find someone to replace him but am beginning to miss my 6 weekly treatments. I have been given a couple of na

We are very sorry to hear that you have lost your practitioner after so many years. Sadly as we become a more mature profession this has started to happen a little more frequently. We know just how much people value the fact that there is someone who has seen them through a great deal and with whom there is no need to go over ground that is already long familiar.

In these situations we always advise people to contact other local practitioners, and for want of a better word 'interview' them. You will find that nearly all will agree to talking to you for a long enough time to see if they and where they work are to your taste, and if they won't then to some extent you have already saved yourself the bother of someone who probably isn't going to be the one for you. From the practitioner's perspective this makes perfect sense. You have shown a commitment to long term treatment, and as such they would be 'inheriting' someone who is very likely to be coming to them for some time.

Although it should be possible for any new practitioner to get hold of the existing notes we find that most patients and practitioners in this situation like to make a fresh start. We all have slightly different ways of approaching our work, and although case history is important there are other factors which are likely to be more central to a new beginning.

You will probably find that if someone has been around for a very long time there are going to be colleagues who have been inspired by him and try to emulate the way he worked. This might well make your selection a great deal easier because it is very likely that you will be directed towards people with whom he was in close contact. 

There is occasionally some merit in having a trial session. We knew of one practitioner whose manner with patients was wonderful but whose needle technique might have been described as 'brusque'. It is, after all, acupuncture that you are signing up to, so if someone really doesn't suit you in that department it would be good to find out sooner rather than later.

We hope that this helps and that you find someone who will last at least another thirty years.

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