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Acupuncture to relieve pain from trapped nerve

Q:  I am writing with a query regarding my husband. He had a vasectomy in August and unfortunately, due to complications during the procedure,  has suffered a trapped nerve on one side which is still painful at certain times. He has been referred to a consultant and been told there is no corrective procedure for this and he would just have to make use of long term pain relief, but he does not want to take long term medication. We are wondering if acupuncture would be able to relieve the pain from this trapped nerve and, if so, what would be involved?

Treatment would involve either needles and moxibustion, the use of a burning Chinese herb, and your husband can rest assured that needles do not have to ber applied locally to achieve an effect, or no-one would ever seek help with haemorrhoids ever again. The majority of points used in early sessions lie on the lower arm and lower leg, with a number of more powerful ones on the trunk and back.

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/chronic-pain.html

shows. Indeed, much of the early research into acupuncture in the West was focused on this area after seeing some of the film of operations in the East performed under acupuncture and demonstrations of dramatic reductions in pain that people appeared to experience from a few needles. Of course, the main western preoccupation was to make sense of this in terms of neurotransmitter chemicals or natural painkillers like endorphins and enkephalins, rather than understanding it as a reinstatement of the proper flow of energy, or 'qi' in an area, but we were grateful anyway to see acupuncture being taken more seriously.

A great deal depends on how your husband's nerve is trapped. If there is impingement of the nerve a great deal depends on whether there is post-operative inflammation in the surrounding tissue which treatment may be able to help to reduce, thus breaking the cycle of pain, or whether the operation has simply caused the nerve to be jammed between physical structures where change is less likely. There is no doubt that acupuncture treatment may well be able to achieve some pain relief, and the main issue is usually how much and how sustainable that change is.

Usually there is no way of predicting how someone will respond in circumstances like this, and most practitioners will probably say that the best way is to have a couple of sessions to allow them to assess the viability of treatment, based both on feedback from the patient and from signs and symptoms which they themselves interpret. In any event there should be some reaction within three to four sessions, and a responsible practitioner will draw a line in the sand then if the patient is not making progress, however pleasant the actual experience of treatment may be.

The best advice we can give is that you visit a BAcC member local to you and seek a face to face assessment of whether they think acupuncture treatment may be beneficial. There are a number of ways in which they cam make this assessment and we are confident that they will give you an honest view.

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