Can acupuncture weight problems associated with hypothyroidism?

Q:  I have had hypothyroidism for approx 6 years now, and despite endless efforts, yoga, Zumba, walking, Pilates, diets of every kind, supplements, etc etc, I have not been able to shift the extra weight I gained when my thyroid condition first presented. 
I am now approx 1.5 stones overweight and very miserable and self conscious as a result. And the constant failure despite every effort is even more disheartening. 
Now I am contemplating acupuncture for weight loss but need to check if I can have acupuncture if I have hypothyroidism? 
I also have a brain tumour, (an ependymoma in the 4th ventricle, for which I was treated 11 years ago with surgery where some of it was able to be removed, followed by 6 weeks radiotherapy) 
So, please could you advise if I am able to have acupuncture?

A:There are no contra-indications to the use of acupuncture when someone has hypothyroidism. Indeed, we are sometimes asked if acupuncture can be used to treat hypothyroidism, and a sample answer that we gave says:

A: There isn't a great deal of research to underpin a straight recommendation for the use of acupuncture in the treatment of hypothyroidism. What there is suggests that acupuncture may be of benefit, but this is a condition for which some form of maintenance medication is often essential and this makes testing it in trial conditions somewhat more difficult.

For the same reason our members are always told to be cautious in treating conditions where someone is on essential medication. Recommending that someone stops their medication is out of the question - only a doctor should be making this decision in the case of essential meds - and there is always an issue about adjustment. If the treatment as the effect of improving someone's thyroid function it may then mean that the dose of medication which they take may no longer be suitable. Since it often takes a long time to achieve a stable balance with the medication in the first place, it is important to avoid as much as possible the kind of yo-yo adjustments which people often experience when they are first prescribed their medication.

That said, the important point to make is that the Chinese would have recognised the symptoms of hypothyroidism two thousand years ago but have no idea about the relationship they had to a thyroid malfunction. The symptoms would have been analysed within the diagnostic systems of Chinese medicine, and a treatment plan devised to help correct them. The Chinese understanding of human physiology was entirely different, and rested on a concept of energy, called 'qi', and its various functions and inter-relationships. The kinds of symptoms which someone experiences with hypothyroidism would be linked to a failure of organic function as understood by the Chinese, and even where there was no explicit correspondence, the underlying premise that where there is balance symptoms disappear would nonetheless apply.

If you are thinking of having treatment it would be good to see if you can discuss your specific presentation first with one of our members, and see if they feel that this is something which they feel would be of benefit to you.

We would offer the same advice today and re-iterate the fact that it can quite often take a long time to stabilise thyroid medications. If acupuncture does have the effect of improving the residual function of the thyroid it may take a while to balance the doses of medication again.

We are always cautious when people ask us about using acupuncture for weight loss. There are a number of well-defined and easily recognised syndromes in Chinese medicine where additional weight gain, often in the form of retained fluids or precipitated by an under-performance of parts of the system, may be amenable to treatment. However, even here there is no guarantee that someone will lose weight, and evidence overall for acupuncture and weight loss is poor. It is also, even when part of a successful regime, not entirely clear what causes what. Very few people do only one thing to try to lose weight, and it might be any factor or all in combination which achieve a result.

What we can say is that there may be some aspects of managing one's diet according to Chinese medicine principles might be of benefit, and most practitioners will be only too happy to share this simple wisdom whether you proceed with treatment or not. The best and only advice we could give, though, is to see a BAcC member local to you for a brief assessment of your own unique situation and whether they think acupuncture treatment may be of benefit.

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