For the past 4 years I have experienced an intermittent tingling sensation running down my right arm that has not been painful-like pins and needles. Recently this has also lead to pain in the right wrist. GP exploration reveals no identifiable cause

From a western/conventional medicine perspective this might well be a trapped nerve, and given the location of the sensation which you have had and are now experiencing the trapping might be anywhere from the neck down. The fact that the sensation has not been too powerful until recently suggests that the level of impingement has not been too great, and this might mean that the clinical signs are not that obvious to examination. GPs tend to be pragmatic, and since the cost of trying to establish what it is might be disproportionate to the amount of disruption the problem is causing it might be difficult to pursue much further. The one option you might want to consider from this perspective is osteopathy, since a small adjustment of the bone structure might be enough to deal with the problem.

That said, from a Chinese medicine perspective we see a great many of these undefined or ill-defined problems. We see them as disruptions in the flow of energy, and whenever these occur there will always be pain or discomfort. This can arise from a blockage in what we call 'qi', the energy of the body, or equally often from excesses or deficiencies in the flow. The skill of the practitioner lies in determining whether this is a local problem or whether it is a systemic problem and the tip of a much larger iceberg which needs addressing. We then use needles to reinstate the correct balance.It is always impossible to predict at a distance whether treatment might work. It is in the nature of the system of medicine to see each person as unique and different, and for this reason twenty people with an identical named condition might have twenty different treatments. This is not a method solely confined to complementary medicine; the great Canadian physician William Osler often said 'the good physician treats the disease, the great physician treats the patient who has the disease.' This is why we always advise prospective patients to contact a local BAcC member for an informal chat about what may be possible. Most are happy to give up a little time without charge to offer a more informed view face to face of what may be possible

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