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Can acupuncture help sensory nerve discomfort?

Q:  I've recently developed sensory nerve discomfort on my shoulder blades .I already have idiopathic peripheral neuropathy so I know what nerve pain is . This is touch related as there is no discomfort when there is no clothing touching my shoulder blades . I did a simple experiment with 3 shirts/t-shirts . The first had a rough/course texture , the second had a gripping texture , the latter was soft & smooth . The first two both caused discomfort , the latter virtually none , I had a friend present & we both agreed on the descriptions regarding the "shirts" .
I would also add that I use a thoracic brace for exercising & the pressure of the brace on the my shoulder blades seems to alleviate the discomfort .
I thus thought , albeit from a very limited understanding of acupuncture : its use of pressure points & the fact that a GP at  my practice has used acupuncture for many years for a variety of maladies for the benefit of practice patients is there any evidence of its efficacy in treating sensory nerve discomfort .

A:We do have a number of fact sheets on our website about neuropathic pain and also a number of answers to earlier queries about diabetic neuropathy, but none really quite addresses the problem which you describe.

We suspect that with your problem it really is a case where going back to first principles may offer the best chance of finding some relief from the problem you have. As you probably already know from background reading, the theories of traditional acupuncture are based on the flow of energy called 'qi' and its rhythms, flow and balance in the body. Understanding how problems occur means being able to identify and understand how the flow might have been disturbed where the problem is and also how this fits against the overall backdrop of someone's health. The practitioner invariably, as with any pain, asks questions about whether the problem area feels hot or cold, responds to hear or cold, responds to pressure, is better or worse at different times of day, and so on. The answers to these questions all point to specific disruptions in the flow of energy and hopefully towards solutions.

There are a number of formula points which can be used as short term palliatives, and on occasion these may provide a permanent solution. The majority of cases like this, though, where there is an area of skin and superficial muscular discomfort, require something more sophisticated by way of treatment. Of course, in saying this, we would ourselves be looking at the other possible environmental factors which might be causing the problem, but we assume that you have probably done an exhaustive check on things which might have affected the area.

The best advice we can offer, since it is an unusual and specific presentation, is to visit a BAcC member local to you for a brief assessment of whether acupuncture might be of benefit. A skilled practitioner could usually elicit in a very few minutes how treatable something is, and most of our colleagues are happy to give up a short amount of time to make this determination

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