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Remedy for frozen shoulder ?

As our factsheet shows

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/frozen-shoulder.htmlthere is some fair evidence that acupuncture can be helpful. This is far from conclusive, so we can't make specific claims, but the evidence does suggest some benefit as well as some reduction in pain. The only problem is that it is difficult to stop someone using the shoulder while it improves, so progress can often be hampered by unintended setbacks when people reach out automatically and trigger pain and discomfort.Our fact sheets have been around for some while, and we always research what other papers have been published since the ones we referenced there. There isn't a great deal that's new, and indeed an interesting review of treatment optionshttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4363808/

only mentions acupuncture as an adjunct to interventions like physiotherapy. There is a reference to a study from Iranhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4363808/which looks like it has been translated word by word using a dictionary, but allowing for the rather odd language there have clearly been some good results. However, a 2012 systematic reviewhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22405512was rather downbeat about most treatment options.The great strength of Chinese medicine, however, is that it treats the person, not simply the condition. A hundred people presenting with a frozen shoulder may be treated in a hundred different ways because each person is unique in the balance of their energies, and the practitioner will be working to establish what it is about the overall balance which has impaired someone's ability to recover. Many people will damage their shoulders but be fine again within a week. When the damage takes longer to hear the obvious question, apart from the severity of the cause, is what is blocking healing. Sometimes this is outside the practitioner's control; as we said above it is a very difficult joint to immobilise in order to help recovery. Often, though, there is an underlying imbalance which means that a person is getting the best from their own system.This means it can be rather difficult to generalise, and the advice we invariably give is to visit a local BAcC member for an informal chat about what may be possible. Most members are happy to give up a little time without charge to assess whether treatment may be of benefit, and many prospective patients value this chance to meet the practitioner before committing to treatment. 

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BAcC Factsheets

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