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Scalp acupuncture for child with cerebral palsy

Q:  Scalp acupuncture for a child with cerebral palsy.  I need a practitioner in UK with experience.in scalp acupuncture..

A:  Scalp acupuncture is a fairly recent development, rather similar to ear acupuncture which was first introduced by Nogier in the 1950s. The main proponent of scalp acupuncture was a Japanese practitioner called Yamamoto, and there are a number of UK practitioners who use his techniques. More recently we have seen training courses run by Suzanne Robidoux who is explaining and promulgating the systems developed by a Chinese practitioner called Dr Feng.

In both these cases, however, the training is at postgraduate level, and there are no agreed standards for what counts as a 'scalp acupuncturist', and therefore no way that we could begin to recognise whom we could recommend. All that we can say is that if you use a search engine like google and type in 'scalp acupuncture' and your city or town, you may find someone who has trained in one of these systems.

There are a number of case reports like this one

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3833473/


which offer considerable encouragement, although we have to say that case studies stand a long way down the chain of evidence because there are so many confounding factors which might skew the results. That said, we are aware of considerable excitement amongst our members at the possibility that scalp acupuncture may offer a treatment for a number of intractable conditions like Parkinsons disease. 

We always advise caution, though: if something is really effective its use tends to proliferate very quickly. We have seen a number of claims for the treatment of degenerative eye conditions, for example, in two clinics in USA and India but nowhere else. That said, this 'expert' had a go at being treated by someone who had just undertaken some training, and it was a remarkably powerful effect which, given some of the traditional points used, is not entirely a surprise.

It is best to be wary of unrealistic expectations, therefore, and the best way to address this is by having clear and measurable outcomes, and by setting clear review dates after each group of four or five sessions to see if there is or has been sustainable change. 

 

 

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