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How effective is acupuncture on nerve pain caused from pelvic radiation for prostate cancer?

Although there is an increasing amount of research into the use of acupuncture treatment after radiotherapy the majority of studies are aimed at specific symptoms which often accompany treatment - nausea, dry mouth, fatigue etc. Unfortunately nerve pain or generalised pain in the pelvic region is not amongst them, and we suspect that this is because the generality of the symptoms makes it difficult to assemble meaningful trial groups. The results of the research show some quite positive outcomes for dry mouth and nausea, but as always is the case with acupuncture research the conclusion is that larger and better designed trials are needed. Even if someone had researched nerve pain specifically, the chances are that this is what the conclusion would be. The bar is set very high, and not always appropriately, for the work we do.

That said, there is a substantial and growing body of evidence for the treatment of neuralgia with acupuncture, even in the strange limiting cases like phantom limb pain, so it would not be a bad idea to see if treatment could alleviate some of the discomfort. The effects of radiotherapy in terms of the heat and scarring of tissue are outcomes which can clearly be translated into the diagnostic systems of Chinese medicine, and a practitioner can hope to address some of these within the overall constitutional setting within which they have had an effect.

The idea of context is central to Chinese medicine. Every is a unique blend of energies, so even when two people have the same symptoms they might arise from different internal disturbances. The skill of the practitioner of traditional acupuncture lies in treating not the symptom but the person as a whole. This means that the kinds of damage which radiotherapy can do will differ from person to person, both in terms of severity and in terms of potential for recovery.

The best advice that we can give is that you visit a local BAcC member for an informal chat about what may be possible. Most of our colleagues are happy to give up a little time without charge to establish whether acupuncture treatment might be worthwhile, and this gives you a chance to meet them and see where they work before committing to treatment. There is nothing to lose from trying treatment. Not only is acupuncture a very safe therapy but it does not have any major side effects. Even if the treatment managed to help you to deal with the discomfort it may be worthwhile.

The key thing is to set measurable outcomes from the beginning so that you can judge how well the treatment is working. Amounts of painkillers, sleep disturbance and general energy levels are the usual markers, and using them sidesteps the problem that people can feel good on some days, bad on others, and are not always able to say on any given day whether they are feeling better overall. 

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