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Owing to a brain stroke my father's left hand is not working. Would acupuncture help

Q:  My father suffered from brain stroke 5 yrs ago. He is getting physiotherapy but his left hand is still not working. Can he have acupuncture therapy for this? Does this procedure have any side effects?

A: We are sorry to hear of your father's continuing problems.

Let's deal with the easy answer first. There are very few side effects from acupuncture, and the vast majority are transient. We put together a safety website with the two leading medical acupuncture organisations (www.acupuncturesafety.org.uk)  which quotes a number of research studies. These show that acupuncture ranks as one of the safest therapies around. There are occasionally minor reactions to treatment, like headaches or tiredness, and very rarely an injury caused by the needles, but when you consider that there are over 4 million treatments being given each year the number of these is remarkably low.

The other side of your question is more difficult to answer. We have on the BAcC website a very thorough review paper

 http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/arrc/public-review-papers/stroke-and-acupuncture-the-evidence-for-effectiveness.html

as well as a simpler factsheet

http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/3894-stroke.html

which are both very encouraging about the use of acupuncture for the after effects of stroke. In China, however, it is common practice to start treatment on the day of the stroke itself and to treat daily or more to try to restore the 'lost' functions as quickly as possible. The received wisdom is that if the treatment is delayed it becomes progressively more difficult to achieve the same level of result and the final outcome may not be as good. This is paralleled by some treatments in the west, where drug intervention on the day may work when a gap means it won't. The fact that your father is now five years on from his stroke suggests that where he is now may not improve a great deal.

However, there's no point in being unduly pessimistic. All of us have taken on cases like this and managed to achieve a great deal more than we expected. The great strength of Chinese medicine is that it treats the individual, not the condition, and there is always a chance that if someone's baseline constitution is strong they may be able to achieve quite a great deal of improvement. Full restoration of function would be a stretch, but some gain may be possible.

The best advice, which we invariably give, is to visit a local BAcC member with your father to get a face to face assessment of what may be possible. Most of our colleagues are more than happy to give up a little time without charge to see whether acupuncture treatment may be of benefit.  

 

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