Acupuncture for a stroke

Q:  I'm trying to find help with my (central post-stroke pain syndrome) I've had for 28 years after a stroke hemorrhage in 1990. I have tried everything from oramorph , Trans cranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation, spinal cord stimulation HF10 and other interventions all with no benefit so would acupuncture help?

A:  We have to be honest and say that if all of the other therapies you have tried over the last 28 years have failed to effect a change it would be a very considerable surprise if acupuncture treatment suddenly proved to be the answer. However, we are not entirely sure what the CVA has caused by way of continuing symptoms under the generic title of CPSP, and there are aspects of post stroke treatment where the blockages which arise at the time of the event will stay blocked until someone clears them. We do occasionally hear of people having dramatic changes twenty or thirty years after a problem began but this is quite a rare event, and we would never use examples like that as the basis for a recommendation.

We have gathered a considerable amount of information about the treatment of strokes in a rather dense review paper which can be found here

https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/arrc/public-review-papers/stroke-and-acupuncture-the-evidence-for-effectiveness.html

but the short answer to questions about efficacy is that in China acupuncture treatment, when used, commences almost immediately before the system has become 'fixed' in a state of disrepair, and the evidence suggests that this maximises the chances of regaining residual function quickly. The longer people wait for acupuncture treatment, the less well it seems to work and the less overall effect it seems to have.

Pain management is something for which acupuncture has developed something of a reputation since Nixon's visit to China in the 1970s and the sight of people having operations under acupuncture anaethesia. This led to a proliferation of trials and because neurotransmitter levels are easily measured a great deal of good evidence about the use of acupuncture to stimulate their release. Many Pain Management clinics base their work on this. The central question is how much relief and how sustainable, and it may be a matter of weighing up the cost and inconvenience against the amount of relief treatment can offer, it indeed it does work a little. 

The best advice that we can give is that you visit a local BAcC member to seek their view in a brief face to face assessment of what may be possible, depending in the exact presentation it is that you need help with. We also think that cranial osteopathy might be another pathway which might offer some potential for change, but we don't have a central referral point to which we can direct you. Many osteopaths use cranial techniques, but some spend a great deal of time on this work and are often the local 'go to' people for difficult cases. we would hope that any you might contact direct you to the most

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